beijing

People were warned not to attend a banned vigil remembering the deadly Tiananmen Square crackdown as authorities mute China’s last pro-democracy voices.
Human rights groups are urging action to call attention to alleged Chinese abuses against Uyghurs, Tibetans, and residents of Hong Kong.
The meetings in Anchorage, which continue with a closing session on Friday, were a new test in increasingly troubled relations between the two countries.
The officials said the information was evidence of bad character, in an effort to invalidate the women’s accounts of abuse in Xinjiang.
The White House said it had "deep concerns" about the way in which Beijing "communicated" its early findings on the coronavirus outbreak.
The politically sensitive investigation comes amid uncertainty about whether Beijing might try to prevent embarrassing discoveries.
The mass arrests, including of former lawmakers, were the largest move against Hong Kong’s democracy movement since the law was imposed by Beijing.
Authorities are stepping up a crackdown on opposition to tighten Beijing’s control over the territory.
The three former lawmakers disrupted meetings debating a now-approved ordinance that criminalizes any insult to or abuse of the Chinese national anthem.
A mass resignation by the pro-democracy camp would leave Hong Kong’s legislature with only pro-Beijing lawmakers.