beirut bombing

Eleven years later, as Hariri's Future Movement holds its annual commemoration of the assassination, we should remember that the violence in Lebanon did not start or end on the 14th of February.
Spread love and kindness to your fellow man. Open your heart to the magic of life. Offer support and hope to people that need it. Be the leader that you know you were born to be and show humanity there is another way.
Terrorism aimed at civilians leads to justifiable fears about our dangerous world. If we love to travel we need to continue to travel: exploring and enjoying, staying savvy, smart -- and comfortable.
  Coverage vs. Attention  — Who affects the other more?   Notice the red curve of social media attention in the context of
The narrative in the mainstream media is that ISIS are against us because they are Muslims, they hate us, they hate our way of life and so on, all against the West. Very rarely does the media talk about the suffering of the people in the Middle East at the hand of these terrorists.
It is so easy to simplify things, and to cast blame for the horrors we are witnessing today by demonizing an entire religious community for the actions that a tiny fraction of them committed. But we are smarter than that. To understand how to fight terror, we need to understand how we got here.
The Lebanese government's reputation couldn't be worse, especially the ministry of interior and Al Machnouk. Ever since the trash protests escalated in Beirut last August, all eyes have been on the Internal Security Forces (ISF) and Nohad Al Machnouk
If our political leaders want to lead, and if they want our policies in the region to be successful and endure better than they have over the past decade, they should take a long look at how we got to where we are.
Islam doesn't inherently make people violent or peaceful. Like virtually all religions, it depends on the meaning it's given by individuals or societies.
"We are not a nation that delivers children back into the hands of ISIS murderers."
There are those who scold us for our outpouring of grief in the wake of the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks on Paris. They try to make us feel guilty for not demonstrating the same grief over the slaughter in Beirut, Lebanon, just a day earlier, or the massacre in Kenya. Political correctness has no place in matters of the heart.
BEIRUT -- We don't yet know if the attack on the Russian airliner in Sinai, the suicide bombs in Beirut and the Paris onslaught were conceived and coordinated by ISIS leadership in Syria and Iraq. If they weren't, Europe has a different problem -- but one no less serious.
We may not share the same religion, same culture, same language and same views, but we definitely share the same sentiments. We all have emotions and feelings, and our sincerest condolences go out to all the families who lost their loved ones in this deadly act.
In rightfully and legitimately condemning selective grief, Lebanon (and for that matter the entire world) forgets that it is a country that selectively grieves all the time.