Benigno Aquino

Never previously has a state of emergency been declared as a result of a single bombing or kidnappings, which were in any
But there is a reason why Aquino remains to be a popular leader, especially when compared to his predecessors in their twilight
Duterte won the ballots of nearly 40 percent of 44 million voters, lured by his success against crime in Davao, despite the questions his policies raised among human rights campaigners.
duterte flag It was not until the middle of the 20th century that Italy began to reconstitute its foundations and embark on an economic miracle. In many ways, the Philippines is caught in the same interregnum.
MANILA, Philippines -- In the Philippines presidential election this week, many of the voters felt that enough was enough. The Aquino administration was a disappointment to many. Most cast their votes for change -- the more radical, the better.
Rodrigo Duterte's truculent defiance of political tradition has drawn comparisons with U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, as have his references to his libido.
Will the Philippines fall into a Machiavellian cyclical history as it did in the 20th century or, instead, embark on a Hegelian march towards the terminus of genuine democracy?
Since the last of the televised debates among presidential candidates, Duterte has offered no coherent foreign policy, no policy for the domestic economy and job generation, and no form of behavior even closely resembling statesmanship.
Elections have become an obscene theatre of performance over substance. While America is coping with the horror of potential
With less than two months before the elections, the presidential race in the Philippines is as tight as you can get. According to one survey, four presidential candidates are essentially tied.
The challenge for democrats today, whether in Metro Manila or Washington D.C., is to end dysfunctional forms of decision-making that are giving a bad name to democracy -- the greatest gift of modernity.
A tribunal this year uncovered grave violations against the human, economic, and cultural rights of Filipinos by Washington and their own leaders.
It was 32 years ago, August 21st, 1983, that I witnessed a murder. I didn't actually see it, mind you. The gunshots. I was more an ear-witness than eyewitness. The victim was a 50-year-old politician named Benigno Aquino Jr. -- known to everyone in the Philippines by his nickname "Ninoy."
The Philippines' politics has become more dynamic, less predictable, and therefore more interesting as we get closer to the fateful 2016 elections.
You don't have to be an expert to realize that with the Philippines' weak state institutions, hobbled by entrenched networks of political patronage, and only a single six-year term in office, there is just so much a well-meaning leader can do to overhaul a broken political system.
After Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush declared the Philippines a second front in the war on terror ("Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines").The egregious human rights violations committed by the Philippine military and paramilitary forces are some of the most underreported atrocities in the media today.
While the Philippines is waging the snail's pace legal warfare, China is dramatically altering facts on the ground on a daily basis. By all means, the real struggle in the South China Sea is to protect your position on the ground, defending every inch of your territorial claim lest others will Darwin you out.
At its very core, the Philippines is an idea, representing a pluralistic land with hospitable people, who have always welcomed persecuted people from around the world. It is an all-embracing society that has been open to peoples from around the world.