bereavement

During the Covid-19 pandemic, families around the world have moved their funerary traditions online.
Karen Meredith’s son Ken was killed in Iraq in 2003. She told us what it was like getting a letter of condolence from President George W. Bush and gave her reaction to President Trump’s comments following the deaths of four green berets in Niger.
You can't "remind" someone of their pain, she points out.
It will hurt to be around family and friends with living children.
Each of these families made decisions that feel right for them for this year. The diversity in their choices illustrates
This playlist brings back wonderful memories of my uncle and me. You can read more in Passed and Present: Keeping Memories
So I suggest that, if it feels right to do, a widow or widower might write things, say things aloud, or say things in their mind to the spouse who has died. And making that part of the routine of going to be bed or first being in bed might be especially valuable.
Age is irrelevant to me. Sharp minds usually stay sharp. It's the ears that stop listening or don't listen at all that bothers me and, I'm sure, that all the grieving parents in Arizona want is to get the same unpaid time off as someone who has a child, or cares for a sick family member, or service member. It's not about business, it's about compassion.
It is impossible to explain to others who haven’t experienced losing a parent what it feels like. How much a parent can be