Berkeley Repertory Theatre

This week, stage spellbinder Mary Zimmerman returns to Berkeley Rep where she has staged numerous productions.
New breakthroughs in technology have a long history of disrupting the status quo. When I first learned how to type, it was on a manual typewriter that, if you hit the carriage return handle hard enough, might fall off the desk.
If superlative acting interests you -- and you probably wouldn't be reading this if it didn't -- you're well advised to make every effort you can to see Phylicia Rashad as Shelah in Tarell Alvin McCraney's Head of Passes, at the Public.
Since 1979, when Mimi Sheraton's cookbook entitled From My Mother's Kitchen: Recipes and Reminiscences was first published, its readers have embarked on an intimate journey through a lifetime of Jewish cooking.
Macbeth runs through April 10 in Berkeley Rep's Roda Theatre, 2025 Addison St., Berkeley. Tickets are $35 to $145, from 510
Photograph:Frances McDormand and Conleth Hill; photo courtesy of kevinberne.com. It stars Conleth Hill (who is probably most
The San Francisco Opera recently scored a major success with its new production of Donizetti's 1835 opera, Lucia di Lammermoor, which had been updated to some kind of modern mythic landscape.
Dec. 22, 23, 26, and 27, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, 2025 Addison St., Berkeley, 510.647.2949, berkeleyrep.org. At the end
It's no secret theatre districts act as important economic engines in urban areas. Although many theatres have been built in reasonable proximity to concert halls and mass transit lines, grouping auditoriums together as part of an architectural concept started nearly 100 years ago.
The Hypocrites, a Chicago-based troupe that's esteemed for its unique approaches to classics, obviously knows how to make a reviewer look up and take notice, even with a fussy old operetta like Gilbert and Sullivan's Pirates of Penzance.
Whether one is searching for a window of opportunity, hoping to ride a groundswell of support, or participating in an established grassroots movement, the importance of seizing the moment and making the most of its potential can never be underestimated.
On January 29, 1966, when Sweet Charity opened on Broadway at the Palace Theatre, the song which became one of the show's biggest hits was "Big Spender." The number featured a lineup of bored, jaded, and cynical taxi dancers offering their bodies to prospective customers.
I felt as if I had landed in a science fiction film. There I was (just like Keir Dullea in 2001: A Space Odyssey), propped up in a sitting position, surrounded by silence and staring at a soothing green wall with a sense of idiotic wonderment.
One of the hardest tasks for theatre companies is to find a way to make classics of the dramatic literature accessible to modern audiences.
As someone who was raised in a family of atheists (and whose father taught high school science), I often find myself standing on the sidelines as hordes of true believers abandon all objectivity and embrace a new technology, a cherished sport, or a form of corporate mythology with gusto.
Ballet to the People came equipped to X's and O's, the Berkeley Rep world première of a play about violence in American football: she brought an interpreter, a former quarterback from the great state of Texas, to the docudrama subtitled, with gentle irony, A Football Love Story.
The course of ardent love needs to involve pain, and sometimes even agony or tragedy, doesn't it? That's the formula in theater, if not always in life.
Few people would deny that politics is highly theatrical. Whether in film (The Candidate, All The President's Men, Lincoln) or onstage (The Best Man, Frost/Nixon, All The Way), conflict is easily found and ripe for dramatization.
Kathleen Turner is one of my favorite actresses and Molly Ivins was a hero. I had the pleasure of seeing Kathleen Turner in Red Hot Patriot the Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins at the Berkeley Rep. Here are 10 things I learned.
Like a religious deathbed conversion, wretched excess may be the antithesis of everything a person stood for in his sane, tightly disciplined life. But there comes a time when giving in is a better option than merely giving up.