Bernard-Henri Levy

The ill winds of history are blowing again toward Kurdistan. Serious threats have been made by Kurdistan’s powerful neighbors
I was listening to a German parliamentarian the other night. She was making some anodyne comments about transatlantic friendship
PARIS -- Ancient Greek had two words for the people: the "demos" of democracy and the "laos" of the mob. With his puerile call to shift the burden of his own errors and his reluctance to reform onto the shoulders of Greece's fellow Europeans, Tsipras is leaning toward the latter manifestation -- and promoting the worst version of Greek politics.
The most serious challenge to the nuclear deal may be that it does not at all address the human rights record of the Tehran theocracy or statements challenging the legitimacy of Israel. However, from the perspective of the Obama Administration and most U.S. allies, the nuclear deal is seen as a first step in empowering a more progressive trend with Iran.
There is a reason over a million people visit the Anne Frank House very year. There is a reason France's most celebrated public intellectual, Bernard Henri Levy, is a proud Jew. A strong and safe Jewish community enriches the cultural life of every nation.
Over the space of a few weeks, taking their place in the audience for BHL's play are former French president Nicolas Sarkozy, incumbent president François Hollande, and Prime Minister Manuel Valls, the young hope of the French left.
It doesn't matter. It's a small, totally irrelevant piece of land. Give the separatists a measure of autonomy.
But it isn't entirely Piketty's arguments and analysis that have intimidated friend and foe alike. Instead, it's his uniquely French adherence to a deeply threatening sartorial affectation.
Against all of the defeatists united in their resignation to retreat before Putin, this European thinker has stepped up to the struggle for the deliverance of the new Ukraine. This man follows in the great tradition of fighters for freedom -- the Resistance to the Nazi occupation of France during the Second World War, the Prague Spring, and the dissidence in the face of Soviet oppression and lies, among many others.
This exhibition has not been cancelled. It has been postponed -- this was a difficult decision to make -- and it will be inaugurated in the month of June of this year.