best friend

Mary and I at the Heartworks fundraiser in 2015 On December 6, 2016 one of the people I have loved most in my life returned
The hardest part is letting go. Not of the friendship. Often that left long ago. Letting go of the ideals in your head. The dream you had when the friendship ignited years ago.
Traveling with your best friend will be tough at times, but, because you both know each other so well, it is much easier to make it work. Here are a few things that will inevitably happen when you have found that amazing bond of travel friendship on a voyage with your very best friend
I was scrolling through Pinterest when I saw this quote, 'Because the love of a mother starts before birth her love will endure long after death.' The quote was not attributed to anyone in particular but I definitely could have said it because I'm still feeling my mother's love 25 years after her death.
What would you do if you saw yourself in another person's body? Not in a Freaky Friday sort of way, but in a spiritual "this must be kismet because nothing else makes sense" kind of way? This other person may very well be your soul mate, or perhaps, they were sent to teach you.
Martha told me that she didn't want people to be sad at her funeral. She wanted them to be happy. I told her that there was no way her friends and family could not be sad. That even though they would know where she was going, they would be sad because they would no longer get to see her sweet smile.
I have no shame in admitting that my mom is one of my best friends. We text throughout the day and talk on the phone a few times per week. It's been that way ever since I left for college and continues to be that way after graduating and moving out of the house. It will probably always be that way, and that's perfectly OK with me. Here's why moms make the best friends.
Relating to my body like a best friend changed everything. For so long, my mind was a loud, critical, bossy perfectionist who treated my body like a disobedient servant. My mind had to shift to seeing my body as an equal, a peer, a wise being with needs and longings and a tender language all its own.