Bethlehem

Mr. Vice President: As you celebrate Christmas with your family and listen to the gospel story of the birth of Jesus, I hope
This Bethlehem is a fundraising project for a local school playground.
Many were left wondering what was going on with Trump’s speech during his statement on Bethlehem.
Both bought tickets at the same time, but one won much more than the other.
My family and I made our first journey to the Holy Land in 2015 and spent Christmas in Bethlehem, where, for Christians, it all began. Many picture Bethlehem as it is romantically depicted on Christmas cards: sweet, clean, calm. What I found, however, was different.
We should not allow the Christmas story to be stripped of its humanity or cleansed of its muck and grime. Its power is in its reality that should serve to focus our attention on our responsibility to see in the birth of Jesus: the faces of the outcasts for whom there is no room in the inn; the wretched of the earth for whom there is no comfort; and the frightened exiles who seek only safety and refuge. It is only when we do not avert our glance from these reminders that we can understand the story and spirit of Christmas.
And let us stand us stand together with the Palestinian people in their struggle for freedom, supporting the boycott of Israel until justice in the Holy Land is achieved.
"Ever since the new government was installed in order to save the people, there have been periodic insurgencies that we have
Despite the current violent unrest in Israel that is not yet a third intifada, I came away thinking that as hopeless as it too often seems, against all odds, there's still a solution to be had, still time for the sides to sit down at the table and make a deal. But not much.
The school has committed to both strengthening and reviving the Christian Church in the Holy Land. Historically, evangelicals in the region do not have the reputation of playing well with others. Thus, the ecumenical gathering on Saturday, September 19, was significant.
I grew into adulthood and under certain Republican and hawkish narratives.
At a distance, solidarity seems to be this romantic gesture of unity: I see you in me, you see me in you. But what about when we cannot see each other?
I grew up in a Christian home. My father was a physicist and aerospace engineer and mother was a stay at home housewife. When I was little, much as I suspect is the case for most Christian children, I was told about Christmas and Santa Claus.
In the last couple of days I've seen two headlines which make Leila Sansour's film-slash-human-rights-movement Open Bethlehem both perfect and important.