Bhopal

Our country has failed to address the dangers of hazardous chemical facilities.
Over one night in December 1984, the people of Bhopal became the victims of the worst industrial disaster in history. Over the following decades, they became the victims of corporate neglect, as the pesticide plant made infamous by the gas disaster leached toxins into their drinking water.
The administration has moved slowly on the process, and there also appears to be a risk that the administration will not, as our coalition of community and environmental organizations has strongly urged, issue the rule so that it takes effect before President Obama leaves office.
Now, 30 years later, nobody knows definitively how many people died that night or in the weeks or months that followed. *According
I was in Bhopal, India 10 years after the 1984 disaster in which a now infamous Union Carbide pesticide plant released 27 tons of a toxic chemical into a crowded sleeping city, killing 8,000 people immediately and over 20,000 to date. I
It is neither justice nor equality when a U.S. company can evade accountability for the deaths of thousands of people in India.
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Neither Union Carbide nor its successor, Dow, has apologized to the people of Bhopal, India, where what is still known as the world's worst industrial disaster took place 30 years ago this week.
Barton brings to life the character of Eva Gascon, a journalist trying to discern the truth behind Union Carbide's conduct leading up to the tragic gas incident, in a truly captivating manner in this thought-provoking film.