biblical marriage

It is because of my own background that I understand why this matter is not about what other people think or say; it is truly about God's Word for you. And that is why, as an educator, I would like to ask that you take a few moments to think about the way you read the Bible.
Thank you, Michael Cohen, for reminding us how intimately close to the surface of urbanity the assumption of rape is. Thank you for providing (irresponsible and inconceivably nasty) proof of what we need to change and who we need to keep our eye on. It's not always who we might suspect.
Funny enough, those who are often in positions of power that have directed this sail of "one man, one woman biblical standard" don't stay true to their own vows, making this Scripture that they hold in such high regard the laughing stock outside the microcosm of Christianity.
I found myself asking, "When did 'biblical marriage' get to be a thing?" And when did "biblical marriage" come to mean opposition to same-sex marriage?
While I realize that Frank and Claire Underwood -- the scheming, ruthless, and fairly amoral couple at the center of the series -- hardly seem paragons of biblical virtue, hear me out.
In light of the recent resignations of two North Carolina magistrates, explained by their religious convictions that same-sex marriage is a sin or desecrates the "holy institution established by God Himself," I would like to offer a few points of clarification to the overall discourse.
She writes in her book, "I am not a passive person, but I chose to fall into a more submissive role in our relationship because
A trio of Iowa-based religious scholars penned an op-ed in a local paper this week, reminding readers that despite popular opinion, the Bible does not simply define marriage as between one man and one woman.
He explained that it is obvious to scholars (and some religious leaders) that the Bible endorses a wide range of relationships
The earliest Christian communities considered heterosexual marriage to be fraught with problems and was thus to be avoided. Christian leaders argued that married people were too distracted by their familial obligations to be wholly devoted to God.