big coal

Problem is, coal mining jobs aren't coming back -- even under President Trump.
Scientist Roy Spencer is one of dozens of creditors named in Peabody Energy's bankruptcy documents.
Coal ash contains known carcinogens such as arsenic, lead and mercury. This is why the EPA is now regulating coal ash. As power companies shut down or upgrade their facilities, the need to permanently dispose of this hazardous byproduct is growing. So far, these companies have dumped millions of tons of coal ash into unlined landfills across America -- putting our water supply at risk.
As a registered Republican who voted for McCrory in 2012, Deb thought her governor would be willing to help clean up the coal ash pollution she believes contributed to her husband's early death. But after her repeated attempts to contact the governor's office were ignored, Deb is starting to regret helping McCrory become governor.
Leases on federal land ignore coal's real cost, Greenpeace says.
As Americans retreat to cooler locales for the worst of the summer's heat, the Department of the Interior is on a listening tour about coal royalty reform. Interior manages coal on public lands for the public's best interest, which has been ill-served by the below-market prices attached to federal mineral leases for decades.
Climate change constitutes a planetary emergency that we all must confront. And the retirement of these coal plants feels like 200 breaths of fresh air.
The extraordinary show of support for the ACHE Act campaign effectively acknowledges that the only defenders of the cancer-linked radical strip mining operations are a handful of absentee coal companies, indicted coal baron Don Blankenship, and their fringe supporters in Congress.
Panic mode has been declared among the world's climate change deniers. Papal Encyclical "Laudato Si" (Praised Be to You) about climate change has just caused the collapse of the house of cards sustaining the arguments of the Flat Earth Society.
Unfolding with the plaintive air of an elegy, Blood on the Mountain captures mining companies' blatant disregard for the health and lives of coal miners -- and the mountains they call home -- as a timely reminder of the legacy of an essentially outlaw industry and its 150-year reign in West Virginia.