big dreams

Less than a year ago I embarked on a life-changing trip across the U.S. with one goal in mind: creating a positive impact with random acts of kindness. Usually during these types of adventures I have relied on the kindness of others, but this time would be different. I would be the one trying to give back.
A scientist and theologian finds that vivid, memorable “big dreams” are universally human.
For those readers who weren't alive (or old enough) to experience the 1960s, this week we had somewhat of a history lesson, packaged as a Democratic debate. Part of why this happened is that the Democratic presidential campaign has entered into a "convince the minority voters" phase.
As we enter the summer months and "lemonade season," as we call it at Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation, I have the immense pleasure of hearing from children all around the country who are continuing what Alex started.
“If you look at Germany, their dream isn’t just to go to the finals -- their dream is to bring the World Cup home,” he said
At least once or twice in life, often in childhood, most people have a dream that strikes them with unusual power and intensity, a dream so realistic and otherworldly that it burns a lasting impression into their memory.
He asked me that day how involved I wanted to be, and I trusted these three men implicitly and instantly dove in fully to support this dream of creating a nonprofit music festival in Central Park.
I want my daughter to dream... big. And fearlessly. To take the road less traveled. Me? I get to be her cheerleader and sometimes a voice of reason. But right now I am discovering I need to let my child be a child and dream, dream, dream. And in the process I am learning to dream.
In the book of Genesis, Joseph had a hard time as a dreamer. I believe that along with his relationship with God, Joseph kept some spiritual course instructions in his mind. There are course instructions for us today as well, to keep us from wavering off of the course of purpose.