Big Star

Recorded at various studios for reasons of aesthetics and economics, Ed's chance meeting with an old friend affords Glass
So let's take a look at your new album, Uncovered. Years ago, you recorded Cover Girl on which you took on other songwriters' material. I think it was a little more than twenty years ago. What are your thoughts about having such a long career?
Sacred Bones Records here in Brooklyn is one of my favorite record labels to emerge in recent years. One of their latest releases is Moonlust by The Holydrug Couple.
According to Rachael Sage, "I don't do many cover songs--because I've been writing my own compositions since I was a little kid, it's just not really my thing generally, and I can count the ones I've recorded on less than one hand."
When I was running the East Village record store, St Mark's Sounds in the 1980s, Alex Chilton's EP, "Like Flies On Sherbert" [sic] was a record we'd throw on the turntable when we wanted to drive 80+ people crazy on a Saturday afternoon.
While a "Friends" reunion may be the talk of TV lately, anyone hoping for a "That '70s Show" gathering may have been met
"People say that the internet democratized music, which it did in that it allows people to make records without getting the hallowed record deal, because you have all these home studios and stuff. The problem is marketing yourself."
A few nights back, I watched a new documentary that chronicles the rise and demise of the rock band Big Star. Nothing Can Hurt Me was a powerful film -- by turns riveting and tragic in its exploration of what might have been for an incredibly talented group.
It may seem that I'm diggin' in the dirt. Gettin' back to my punk rock roots. Well, some of my favorite new music does seem a wee bit primal, oui? And some of it is even out this world. But all of this music is party playlist-worthy for any weekend getaway.
I think that when I was a kid and was first trying to write music, I would sit at a really nice piano and write what I thought of as classical pieces, although they weren't really. They were instrumental.
Canada's Kathleen Edwards, one of the featured performers scheduled to appear at the Rocky Mountain Folks Festival in Lyons, Colorado next week, answered a few questions related to the festival and performing live, while also revealing one of her hidden talents.
This week we review albums by Neil Young, Bronski Beat, Cheap Trick, Hafdis Huld, The Beatles, and other artists.
I can think of few other artists who have changed their sound so radically, so many times. "Gardening At Night," from 1982, doesn't sound anything like "Everybody Hurts," from 1992.
The truck in Big Star's parking lot isn't supposed to be a tease. The fact that it's been sitting there, idle, for weeks
"I think the culture today is very, very different from what it was in the '60s, and I feel lucky that I grew up at a time when I had these very strong female role models. They were strong women, but their power was very much connected to their creativity and their voice."
Nick’s Beergarden: Conveniently located right under the Blue Line L, Nick’s Beergarden is a top spot for outdoor drinking
The menu: This special menu will pull flavors (and beers) from both restaurants. The first course will feature jonah crab