black carbon

World leaders are gathering this weekend in Kigali, Rwanda to make the biggest climate decision since December's historic Paris Climate Agreement.
The loss of the reflective Arctic sea ice is a case in point. As white Arctic ice is replaced by darker water, less solar
In their May 27th declaration, the leaders of the G7 commit for the first time to cutting near-term warming by phasing down short-lived super pollutants black carbon, methane, and HFCs.
There'll be a couple of bears in the room when the leaders of the five Nordic nations meet President Obama at the White House tomorrow. One is Russian aggression, and how to curb it. The other menace is less publicized, but even more formidable -- climate change.
The Paris climate agreement that nearly 200 nations signed on Friday is important, but it's not enough.
The recent United Nations Climate Summit's (COP21) stated intention to keep planetary warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius was giddy-making news. While we are not out of the woods yet, there just might be a way.
Emissions of carbon dioxide have a far greater role in climate change, but short-lived climate pollutants such as black carbon – soot – also speed up warming, especially in the Arctic.
When California first mandated the widespread addition of renewable energy sources, greenhouse gas emissions have been cut by 100 million tons. Along the way, we have created a thriving green economy that promises only more jobs and more innovation as we reach to do even better.
In this drumbeat of bad news, however, there is a counterpoint of hope -- a strategy that can help slow warming in Alaska and the Arctic enough to avoid some of the worst impacts.
In the end we see that climate change is our largest global environmental threat for the present and future. And air quality poses an unacceptable global health risk.