Black Widow

A series that explores the very different lives and experiences of three women who directly impacted or were affected by drug trafficking.
Presented by the Starz Original Series Power
It's no secret that Hollywood has been making efforts to diversify their representation of women.
For what's turned out to be one of the biggest hits of all-time, the not especially felicitously titled Avengers: Age of Ultron has gotten a lot less love and devotion than the numbers would suggest.
Love it or hate it, we are living in the age of superheroes. They have burst from the pages and the fringes to cement themselves at the forefront of mainstream entertainment, and they show no sign of folding up their capes and flying out of town anytime soon.
Ultron's Black Widow is no less of a hero for falling in love or liking children. She's a complex character, but that complexity doesn't make her special--and it shouldn't.
Jeremy Renner told Conan O'Brien on Monday that he got into "Internet trouble" for his off-color joke about the "Avengers
After watching Avengers: Age of Ultron, Marvel's most recent installment, I feel that it must be considered whether or not the Marvel model is sustainable. Now, before I go on, I must say that I thoroughly enjoyed the movie while sitting in the theater and would recommend it to anyone.
These feel like cinematic end times -- not in terms of Hollywood movies (that horse is already out of the barn), but in the pack-mentality, "hey, it's good enough" approach of critics to the colossus that bestrides summer movies, otherwise known as the Marvel Universe.
“Our heroines embody the ideals of what we can each strive to be," A-Force co-creator Marguerite K. Bennett said during the
Yesterday we were asked about the rumors that Black Widow wanted to be in a relationship with both Hawkeye and Captain America
Police say they suspect insurance claims or inheritance money could be the motive for the killings. Kakehi has denied involvement