black youth

“Screaming Hot Cheetos and Takis / Boy, you better eat your broccoli.”
Creating a future of hope for Opportunity Youth is the issue of our time. An adequate and sustainable solution can only come
How the pioneering "Black Girl Culture Exhibit" gave black teens a safe space to tell their stories.
It has become the social norm to steer clear of pessimism as the new year rolls around. One may see focusing on the deaths of black youth instead of the future of black youth as pessimistic. Nevertheless, we must not confuse being pessimistic with being realistic.
I've seen a lot of really painful and hurtful things being said by people who cannot speak from experience and who have not taken the time to listen to those who can.
What if we carefully listened to the stories of young men in jail, particularly those accused of gun-related crimes, to deeply understand their motivations or sought their advice about how to solve these problems?
If you've turned on your television lately, you've likely seen an ad or two blasting the historic Iran nuclear deal. The reality is, millions are being spent in a lobbying effort to destroy an agreement that has been reached after extensive negotiating and diplomacy between world powers and Iran.
Where are the neighbors? Where are the schools and community organizations? Who reaches out to see what the problem is? Does anyone see this child/youth desperately in need of help and hope? Who listens or offers a helping hand amidst the violence and despair they face daily?
Basic respect and human decency--just plain kindness--can go a long way in building self-esteem in our children and helping a young person in crisis make it to the next step.
My family and I were nomadic nearly my entire childhood, and as an adult I have traveled to over ten countries and lived in three. While freelancing in Paris, several friends began asking for help constructing fun itineraries for their trips abroad.
As we approach the anniversary of the landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education, on May 17th, the story of struggle and progress in Little Rock reminds us of the roots of Black youth activism in American racial history.
While overall rates of disconnection from society are likely to trend down as the nation recovers from the Great Recession, history suggests that disconnected young men of color are in danger of being permanently left behind, and this has implications for future generations.
According to a press release, the first phase of grants, totaling $48,800, was distributed on Feb. 13 to the following programs