blight

The first stop on HuffPost’s “Listen To America” bus tour was St. Louis, Missouri. We learned how communities in "The Gateway to the West" have suffered and where change is needed.
From crime reduction to eliminating blighted properties, cities across the country are using data to improve services, meaningfully engage residents, and make better decisions.
In the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, Rev. Charles Duplessis of Mount Nebo Bible Baptist Church says an estimate that less than half of that area's pre-Katrina population has returned looks accurate.
The post-industrial dystopia emerging on the streets of Detroit may be shocking, but it is not surprising. The crisis results from the convergent forces of fiscal austerity and structural racism in a region defined by its extreme segregation of race, wealth and opportunity.
To dole out fines for wall art, or sell the Detroit Institute of Arts' assets to satisfy creditors in the city bankruptcy, would be to destroy the core of what sustains this city and will continue to make it stronger.
The lessons from the past, including resistance that led to rethinking the top-down approach and discrimination embedded in the postwar federal urban renewal program, suggest that efforts to reshape American cities' landscapes will not succeed without community buy-in.
Meanwhile, Cortana Mall in Baton Rouge took the ailing Sears corridor to a whole new level. In December 2005, most of Cortana
What would you do if your favorite neighborhood watering hole was being demolished for a rich, greedy developer? Handcuff yourself to the bar, naturally.
As Forest City Enterprises markets bonds for Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn -- which includes the most expensive basketball arena in the country -- I'm struck by how tenuous the whole thing is.
I put my toe in the real estate market. I asked friends what should I be looking for, and they all said the same thing, "You gotta find something in a substandard and insanitary neighborhood."
This weekend I was asked to pass judgment on tomatoes. Which is far better than water because a) they have an actual taste, and b) good tomatoes are so hard to come by.