bloody sunday

Even as we're all hypnotized by the presidential race, and the candidates' rhetorical responses to these incidents, we have to recognize that these issues, that impact us directly, that move us to tears and to march in our streets -- are almost exclusively controlled by state and local leaders. Not our president.
The time for silence and patience is long gone. Congressmen Lewis and his colleagues have vowed to keep going with their fight as soon as the House returns from its July 4th recess. We must stand with them as they continue to get into "good trouble."
It is the first detention of its kind following decades of demands for justice.
Directed by Jang Hee-Sun, My Fair Wedding is a curious, but ultimately triumphant documentary that was screened at CAAMFest 2015. Potential viewers should be aware that a huge amount of text is thrown up onto different parts of the screen so that, at times, it almost seems impossible to follow the film.
I'm looking to follow the lead of Dr. Olivia Hooker, who fought to become the first African-American woman to enlist in the U.S. Coast Guard, and build a 21st-century Coast Guard workforce that draws upon the richness of all Americans. We must continue our efforts to be a more inclusive organization that attracts a diverse workforce.
Within the GOP, there's been some ugly rhetoric on issues of race and authority, but that's quite frankly nothing new; what is new, however, is the magnitude of the problem they have been creating for themselves. What is this laundry list, and how will it be affected by the run to 2016?
In our everyday fights to silence the racist chants of misguided college students and stifle overaggressive police who racially profile black children, we must reach the finish line. The next generation should never have to question whether their lives matter.
We must be bold enough to tell our own histories, even as we strive to listen more faithfully. The president reminds us, "America is not some fragile thing."
This weekend in Selma, I marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. I marched, and I saw people from every community acknowledging and revering each other with love. I'm not an isolated activist. I'm one of many, one of many.
Just as the marchers from Selma to Montgomery applied pivotal pressure on Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act in 1965, the people most impacted by North Carolina's voter suppression law are fighting to make sure their voices are heard.