bloomberg soda ban

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney's proposed three cent an ounce tax on soda to fund universal Pre-K made national headlines this week when Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton endorsed the tax. Bernie Sanders then came out against the tax labeling it regressive.
The potential of the emoji as an education tool, what I will call more broadly as emoji-cation, is intriguing given the ubiquity of the emoji.
There is much we still don't understand about how artificial sweeteners may affect humans, but a growing body of research suggests turning to diet soda to feed a sugar craving may not be a good bet. A smart approach is to reduce consumption of sugar, fake or real.
On a sweltering Saturday in June in Istanbul’s old city, Michael R. Bloomberg, power-dressed in a dark blue suit, monogrammed
Indeed, we need to change our food environment if we want to reduce obesity rates and encourage consumer to select healthier
Known as the "Soda Ban" case, even though the rule did not actually ban any sodas, the Court's decision could affect much more than soft drinks. Indeed, the case could have significant and dangerous consequences for public health and regulation.
In order to win the fight against the obesity epidemic, limiting portions is an important and necessary first step toward improving the health of all residents, regardless of where they live. Putting the brakes on big soda also will send a powerful message to the industry.
The word "ban" is a loaded one, virtually guaranteed to inflame readers' passions on an issue.
I hope that the courts favor Bloomberg's proposal and that when we visit a concession stand at a NYC movie theater later in 2014, the largest single-serve soda is 16 ounces as opposed to the 50-ounce size available now.
It's easy to make fun of the "nanny state," but childhood obesity is not a joke. When the court arguments begin again, remember that this decision is about our future. It's about stopping the next generation of New Yorkers from developing potentially deadly habits.
Mayor Bloomberg issued the following statement in the release: Since New York City's ground-breaking limit on the portion
After a series of little-known novels throughout the 1990s, Shriver burst into the public conscience with the Orange Prize-winning We Need to Talk About Kevin in 2003. Her latest novel, Big Brother, is a sobering look at obesity and its effect on relationships.
NEW YORK, July 30 (Reuters) - New York City's plan to ban large sugary drinks from restaurants and other eateries was an
The interesting question a new study set out to answer focuses on the argument that the so-called soda ban isn't fair because it disproportionately affects low-income people.
The proposed soda ban highlights one crucial tenet about Americans: We do not like being told what to do. Rather, we prefer to be seduced by slick marketing and sexy ad campaigns.
Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems in the city of New York as well as in other parts of the U.S., and limiting the sizes of sugar-sweetened drinks is certainly worth trying.
The ban was originally proposed by Bloomberg last year. It was blocked by a judge in March and is back in appeals court this
If you're opening up a food business in New York City, especially once that specializes in indulgences, chances are you've
Bloomberg and his crew have elevated themselves as the benevolent parents, empowered to restrict soda, discipline, and punish if necessary.
Even a former Coca-Cola marketing executive quit amid public mea culpa's for the harm he was doing by pushing Coke in the poverty-stricken pavelas in Brazil. It seemed Coke might be doomed.