blue collar workers

Blue-collar work is in demand for a reason: fewer people want to do it.
Since last week's election, through Facebook, op-eds, emails, and tweets, those who fear the new administration have been
Even dogs have more social capital than truckers. You cannot leave a dog in a closed vehicle but you can truckers. Legislation
China makes way, way too much steel. In 2015, it produced nearly 500 million tons more than it needed. Production of that steel was subsidized by the Chinese government in ways that violate international trade rules, so the price was artificially low. And China suppresses the value of its currency, further falsely reducing the cost of the steel.
Last Sunday, January 17, in a sermon, "Prophecy and Politics," for Martin Luther King Day at Prospect Park United Methodist Church about my experiences as a young man in the civil rights movement, I addressed prejudices against working class whites.
The United States' national political process should be declared a disaster zone. I am embarrassed for our country with how presidential elections have become sideshows.
When you think of entrepreneurship, you probably think of a tech company founder or someone who performs some type of white collar profession. But entrepreneurship has no boundaries and can be developed where any source of great demand can be found.
Over the last several decades we have been bearing witness to the growth of a disturbing streak of aristocratic bias in our cultural fabric and our national temperament, one that is increasingly manifesting itself in the views we hold and the assumptions we make about people who work with their hands.
In 2015 and beyond, blue collar jobs are abundant and lucrative. Its time to end the myth that blue-collar America is second-best America.
The perception about blue-collar careers won't change until students are better informed about the opportunities, and the truth, about what awaits them in the workforce.