Boasting

Radio icon rips into the president for bragging about his ratings amid the pandemic.
“This tweet has been brought to you from Upside Down World,” one person hit back.
A professor broke down why Trump's wild brag can't possibly be true.
The president's boasting didn't go over well at the United Nations.
Life Lessons from the World of Sports: First Do the Job -- Then Do the Celebrating!
The fact is that modesty, or even self-effacement, can be more effective than bragging in creating a good first impression. Most of us know this from being on the receiving end, yet we still err on the side of self-aggrandizement. But why do we get it wrong so much of the time? Here's where some new research may be illuminating.
Studies show that the more you toot your own horn, the more negatively you're evaluated: Self-promoters are not only less liked, but also earn lower salaries and fewer promotions. Bragging about yourself violates norms of modesty and politeness -- and if you were really competent, your work would speak for itself.
Listed are merely a few of the categories of Facebook braggart. If you know any of the following culprits, please use caution when dealing with them, as they tend to be highly into themselves and may not notice when you are choking, drowning or in need of immediate medical attention.
Some of us think that if you're going to boast about knowing things, or people, you should probably actually know them, because it doesn't take long, in an age of smartphones and Google, to find out if you don't.