Bob Fosse

Kelli Barrett takes on "Cabaret"-era Liza in FX's limited series "Fosse/Verdon."
But by the time Fosse's film version arrived three years later, the show was the victim of a changing culture. Its flower
Foster is altogether superb; it almost feels like she's jumped back to Thoroughly Modern Millie, when she not only enchanted
One of the highlights of New York's ongoing United Solo 2016 festival of one-person shows is Mimi Quillin's funny, dishy, and unexpectedly moving Call Fosse at the Minskoff, which just completed three sold-out performances.
Each time a showbiz icon self-destructs we are left feeling dismay and confusion. We are sad to lose someone we loved for
"I'm the kind of girl who's tried everything once," Valerine Perrine purrs in Lenny. As Mrs. Bruce in the Bob Fosse film, her claim, let's say, contained slightly off-color elements.
Recently, a severe heat advisory was upon us in New York City, however for the unsuspecting patrons of a serene Chelsea café which normally tends to the urban chic, there was no warning that performance artist Kenyon Phillips was about to arrive.
Christopher Isherwood (1904-86) was an Anglo-American writer whose novels, memoirs, plays, and diaries span the 20th century, from his modernist beginnings in the late 1920s to his pathbreaking memoirs of the 1970s.
A muse and a mentor can go a long way toward helping an artist transform music into magic. While labanotation is a wonderful tool for documenting choreography, it can't capture the more intangible aspects of dance.
As much as I love Meryl, I'm never going to buy her records, and I haven't been this uncomfortable watching her in a film since, what do you know, Mama Mia! If we're living in any sort of movie musical cinema revival, it's time to start asking ourselves what we sacrificed to get there.
Every now and then when I'm searching for a theme to write about, I find inspiration in a most unusual source: serendipitous calendaring.
Different plays, different moods, different methods but common themes that make for extraordinary nights of live theatre.
Being raised in the entertainment business -- her parents were showbiz legends Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, after all -- may have helped Arnaz hone her career path, but at 63, she is definitely her own woman -- creativity and all.
When Tom Sergeant (Bill Nighy) drops in on Kyra Hollis (Carey Mulligan) totally unannounced in the revival of David Hare's 1995 play Skylight, at Wyndham's, he's clearly there to fan the embers of a six-year affair that ended two years earlier.
Fossey-Fosse's unique childhood, spent with both the gorillas of Rwanda and the dancers of Broadway, paved the way for his pioneering work in mating dance science. In his Dance Lab, he tests the effectiveness of specific dance moves from the animal kingdom on arousal levels in human females.
Chris Mason Johnson's sultry and perfectly human Test enjoyed its European premiere recently at this year's Berlinale. The film is a survivor's tale, told through the POV of a gay character, but so multidimensional that be it man, woman, straight or gay, everyone can relate to its themes.
When Little Me opened in November 1962, its major pluses were Sid Caesar, the Carolyn Leigh-Cy Coleman score and the rarely-miss Neil Simon gags. Revived at City Center this weekend, it can crow about what could be called a breakout performance by Christian Borle.
Like many young men who were starting to embrace their homosexuality, I derived intense pleasure from one of the pictures near the back of the book in which an aging Belle Poitrine (Jeri Archer) looks up at the packed crotch of some faceless stud clad in a Speedo.
I would knock something over and the screams of my mother calling my name to stop breaking things would pierce through the house. I was seriously ready to write dance off just because of this one turn.