bob garfield

"On the Media" co-host Bob Garfield wants CNN's Jake Tapper to put away the "sweet hammer" when dealing with Trump.
"On the Media" radio host Bob Garfield says the press is failing to convey the national emergency of Trump's ascendancy.
This week the nation watched as the #NeverTrump movement folded faster than one of the presumptive nominee's beachfront developments. As many tried to explain away Trump's reckless, racist extremism, a few put principle over party. The wife of former Republican Senator Bob Bennett, who died on May 4, revealed that her husband spent his dying hours reaching out to Muslims. "He would go to people with the hijab [on] and tell them he was glad they were in America," she told the Daily Beast. "He wanted to apologize on behalf of the Republican Party." In the U.K., Prime Minister David Cameron called Trump's proposal to ban Muslims from entering the U.S., "divisive, stupid and wrong." Trump's reply was that he didn't think he and Cameron would "have a very good relationship." The press is also doing its part to whitewash extremism. The New York Times called Trump's racism "a reductive approach to ethnicity," and said Trump's attitude toward women is "complex" and "defies simple categorization," as if sexism is suddenly as complicated as string theory. Not everybody's going along. Bob Garfield, co-host of "On the Media," warned the press of the danger of normalizing Trump. "Every interview with Donald Trump, every single one should hold him accountable for bigotry, incitement, juvenile conduct and blithe contempt for the Constitution," he said. "The voters will do what the voters will do, but it must not be, cannot be because the press did not do enough."
This week Steven Rosenbaum with guest host Bob Garfield. On this week's show... ESPN numbers continue to plummet, Amazon
Media veterans Bob Garfield and Doug Levy are at SXSW talking about a new era in marketing: the relationship era. And guess what? It's not with brands. I had the chance to catch up with them and explore their take on the future of marketing.
Something is changing around web content. The volume of bits of data is growing wildly, and social search seems to be on the rise. So, what's happening?
Suddenly Ad Age columnist and ad seer Bob Garfield is referring to the possibility that the world is entering a Golden Age of Content. This is something of a revelation after years of worrying instead that content was being destroyed by media chaos.
To grey-haired ad execs, wide-eyed media planners, and even furry blue children's characters, Garfield is the man who told the truth, and said: advertising's 'emperor' had no clothes.
Can advertising reconstitute itself, creatively, in a post-film commercial world?
It's time that all of us who watch TV and see irresponsible hate mongering begin to voice our repulsion and punish the offenders by not buying products that are advertised irresponsibly.