bob weir

Although the band comes from the '60s -- formed in Palo Alto in 1965, the Dead became a quintessential San Francisco band
The crowd, all 28,000 of us, flowed from all directions toward the CU Boulder campus, converging on Folsom Field atop a thick cloud of anticipation. Dead and Company was in town to perform two evening stadium concerts under the Flatirons.
Mayer and three of the surviving Grateful Dead band members -- Bob Weir, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann -- along with Oteil Burbridge, formerly of the Allman Brothers, and keyboardist Jeff Chimenti aren't a touring nostalgia act.
50 years ended in an almost-perfect moment of collective explosion. Although the final "Fare Thee Well" Grateful Dead concert was held on July 5th at Solider Field, this incarnation of the band faded away -- for me at least -- at the close of the July 4th concert.
If the Grateful Dead's music can heal the wounds of my family, maybe music can heal the earth. Maybe we need to be dancing and singing more. We need a miracle. Fast.
The Grateful Dead are a band whose influence transcends their brand of epic adventurous music and army of loyal fans known as Deadheads. The California band's imprint in music belies their laid-back '60s hippie image.
With each passing day since these shows were announced, it has become clearer that the "Fare Thee Well" concept, ostensibly conceived to pay tribute to a beloved band on the occasion of its 50th anniversary, bears little resemblance to the Grateful Dead.
The message doesn't give a reason for the cancellations: CORRECTION: An earlier version of this article misspelled the name
Grateful Dead's guitarist Bob Weir joined HuffPost Live to promote the documentary "The Other One," a retrospective on his
Bob Weir sits down with Ricky to talk about what keeps him inspired and successful.
Bob Weir joins Ricky on HuffPost Live to reflect on former bandmate Jerry Garcia's death.
Last Thursday night, I texted a friend: "What should I wear to a Dead show? No tie dye available," and got back, "Tank top, no bra." "I'm afraid that ship has sailed," I wrote.
"Holy shit, I think someone just sent me a bunch of drugs," funky folk singer-songwriter Todd Snider announced from Nashville. "That's mushrooms." Just another day in the life of a well-traveled troubadour.
Twenty-six years ago, in June 1987, I sat in our family's blue Volvo station wagon, my six-year-old legs sticking to the vinyl seats of the car. I had tagged along with my mom to go grocery shopping, and as we pulled onto our street, a song came on the radio.
"That's the most important factor in an environment like ours," he said. "We're never going to be a plush seat theater, but
This week our playlist includes music by Cliff Richard, Thelonius Monk, Matthew Sweet, John Lennon, Zoot Sims, Mahalia Jackson and more.
The Monterey International Pop Festival took place at such a guileless time that the promoters used the word "pop" in its title. Not long after this would have been unthinkable, after the lines were drawn between "pop" music and rock and roll.