boredom

Isolating yourself because of coronavirus? The internet is here for you.
The fact that my children are spending more time indoors during these colder months leads them to be more sedentary and gravitate
The Ghana study was conducted in a context in which "assessment for learning" was being used as a policy driver to promote
If a child has run out of ideas, giving them some kind of challenge can prompt them to continue to amuse themselves imaginatively
I have no idea what will happen, which means I'm on shaky ground. I feel like a tourist, with an orange jacket and clunky white sneakers. This is a good thing.
Boredom, an unassuming emotion, may have a larger impact than we think.
Unstructured time gives kids the chance to explore their inner and outer worlds, which is where creative thinking begins. This is how they learn to engage with themselves and the world, to imagine and invent and create.
I remember my childhood summers fondly, as many of us do. Those halcyon days in which I would leave the house after a still sleepy, leisurely breakfast of cereal that I made myself and come home only for lunch in the middle of a day spent entirely outdoors. We did not live in town and, thus, playmates were limited to siblings and the cousins who lived down the road.
It took four punches of the snooze button to get me out of bed this morning. I wasn't tired. Or sick, for that matter. But I was sick and tired. Sick and tired of the same old routine, minute after minute, day after day, year after year, since 1995, when I made the decision to stay at home to manage our family.
That long to-do list isn't such a bad thing after all.