Boris Yeltsin

The Israeli prime minister referred to his British counterpart as "Boris Yeltsin." But the blunder was conspicuously edited out of an official video of his remarks.
There is a dangerous agenda in modern Russia -- and the West must act.
William Bradley Archive http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-bradley/ Instead, he's reduced to ridiculous misdirection: The
We all have moments in our lives when we think: "Isn't that like the time when..." Those moments are particularly intriguing when a new historical analogy comes to mind, something that has not already made the rounds of coffee shops and Facebook posts.
Twenty years after I left Moscow and turned the ABC News Bureau over to a successor in 1972, I revisited. By then, The bureau looked more like a television operation, with video editing equipment and a direct line to satellite feeds.
This account was compiled from an interview done by ADST in February 2003 with William Green Miller, who was working in Moscow for the American Committee on U.S at the time.
Putin came to power, not in a vacuum, but into a specific context of economic, political and cultural conditions that Boris Nemtsov helped shape, both for better and for worse.
Even during the worst of the U.S.S.R. the square was more symbolic than threatening. For the most part no one went to the Kremlin to die. Very different, however, is Lubyanka, just a short walk up Teatralny Proezd past the Bentley and Maserati dealerships.
Hillary vs. the media bit is a good narrative frame for her, no matter its accuracy. It's certainly accurate enough to have some credibility. And then there's the fact that the public doesn't think much of the news media. This week, in fact, we've seen how it can work for her.
The U.S. should tone down the rhetoric and concentrate on the core issues for worldwide peace and accept the Crimean reality. The solution will evolve slowly, if we let it.