Boris Yeltsin

The Israeli prime minister referred to his British counterpart as "Boris Yeltsin." But the blunder was conspicuously edited out of an official video of his remarks.
There is a dangerous agenda in modern Russia -- and the West must act.
William Bradley Archive http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-bradley/ Instead, he's reduced to ridiculous misdirection: The
We all have moments in our lives when we think: "Isn't that like the time when..." Those moments are particularly intriguing when a new historical analogy comes to mind, something that has not already made the rounds of coffee shops and Facebook posts.
Twenty years after I left Moscow and turned the ABC News Bureau over to a successor in 1972, I revisited. By then, The bureau looked more like a television operation, with video editing equipment and a direct line to satellite feeds.
This account was compiled from an interview done by ADST in February 2003 with William Green Miller, who was working in Moscow for the American Committee on U.S at the time.
Putin came to power, not in a vacuum, but into a specific context of economic, political and cultural conditions that Boris Nemtsov helped shape, both for better and for worse.
Even during the worst of the U.S.S.R. the square was more symbolic than threatening. For the most part no one went to the Kremlin to die. Very different, however, is Lubyanka, just a short walk up Teatralny Proezd past the Bentley and Maserati dealerships.
Let's stop talking about the Cold War's revival as if Vladimir Putin is the one who raised the dead. We are the vampire hunters who failed to drive a stake through its heart. So we shouldn't be surprised, when we go out for a stroll one day to survey our domain, to hear the click of sharp teeth poised to tear into its latest victim.