Boumediene v. Bush

What is the legacy of Guantanamo Bay? 171 men continue to languish there. The Bush torture program has been legitimized by the Obama administration, and indefinite detention has been codified as law.
"I doubt any of my colleagues will vote to grant a petition if he or she believes that it is somewhat likely that the petitioner
The Supreme Court is expected to decide as soon as Thursday whether it will hear the Latif v. Obama and possibly restore a right to meaningful judicial review for detainees imprisoned in the name of the "war on terror."
Perhaps a decade should have been long enough for the constitutional issues over war on terrorism policies to get settled. That hasn't happened, though.
A sharp rebuke from the Supreme Court has not stopped Lindsey Graham from now attempting a third time to broker yet another deal to deny detainees the right to civilian court review.
Without the rule of law, without fair trials even for the despised, there is nothing else that can be called civilization, nothing else that civilized people can live, fight, or die for.
In briefs, the battle lines have been drawn. On the one hand is the government, endorsing Bush-era policies. And for the Uighurs, there is a Boston-based attorney and his team.
The Obama administration is following Bush's lead by unilaterally rewriting the Geneva Conventions, presumably to allow it to continue exploiting prisoners of war for their supposed intelligence value.
From what I have been able to gather about the workings of Bagram, I have no reason to conclude that the prison is now being run according to the Geneva Conventions.
Sadly, our celebrity-obsessed world is unlikely to pay much attention to the International Day in Support of the Victims of Torture, as the death of Michael Jackson dominates headlines.