brain trauma

Rudy Poeschek is one of roughly 80 players claiming the NHL should have done more to protect them from brain injuries.
America has an epidemic of youth violence that must be addressed. If we don't put some of the responsibility on our public schools to tackle the impact of this violence, then we have few alternatives for addressing it at the scope that is required.
The recent headline atop an excellent ESPN article by investigative reporters Steve Fainaru and his brother Mark Fainaru-Wada says retired San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland is "the most dangerous man in football."
According to researchers, high rates of addiction, suicide, mental illness, sexual violence and other ills among Native peoples might be, at least in part, influenced by historical trauma.
On Monday evening, February 23, Israeli President Reuven Rivlin paid a condolence visit to the parents of Adele Biton, 4, the toddler who was critically injured by a Palestinian rock attack on her family's car two years ago, and passed away last week from respiratory complications from a lung infection.
American football is in the midst of a concussion epidemic, and many people are looking for solutions. We figured that one possible place to look for solutions is Mother Nature.
As Americans, we have a duty to provide our nation's heroes with the care and resources they need. Health care reform provides an historic opportunity to find new, collaborative approaches that could better serve them.
Given the increasing awareness of the long-term effects of sports-related brain trauma, AVB and the Tottenham staff find themselves the subject of widespread criticism after the incident.
As a nation, we love football and we don't want to deal with the giant elephant in the room: football is a game that's inherently dangerous to the human brain, and there's really not much we can do about it.
In the wake of the NFL's settlement of the first class action concussion lawsuit brought by former players over brain trauma, much has been declared and yet little has been clarified for those seeking to determine the concussion risks of playing sports.
"We in science can dot the line between blows to the head, brain degeneration and all of these other issues. So, in my view, it's time for the leagues to acknowledge this serious issue and take steps to reduce blows to the brain."
Sitting around an outside table at a restaurant near our home, we were sharing news our youngest child didn't want to hear: Mom and Dad were not going to let her play soccer anymore.
January is always an exciting time for the NFL with the playoffs taking place culminating with the Super Bowl. This year, however, the excitement was tempered as the issue of brain trauma created headlines twice during the month.
There are many other injured men and women who don't have a visible scar who are no less injured. What can be done for them? How can Americans help?
But what she can suddenly do is paint. The oil on linen painting above -- which you may have seen if you've happened into
Tatum is sincere and loving as Leo but he is also a sort of clunky actor. For some this just adds to his charm, while for others it is off-setting. He has a boyish charm and you can certainly see why Paige was attracted to Leo.
Violence is a toy we play with as a culture, a commodity we sell. And the heroes born of violence, created in adolescent enthusiasm, are subject to the same dehumanization process as our designated enemies.