bram stoker

We will be taking the opportunity to revisit some incredible books by Irish authors, from enduring classics to powerful memoirs to contemporary novels that are taking the literary world by storm. So take your pick and spend this March 17th celebrating Ireland through the written word.
What you think is "real" about vampires may in fact be the fictional invention of one man -- Bram Stoker, the Irish author whose 1897 novel, Dracula, ignited an entire vampire industry that is still going strong.
The cast often uses the aisles to rush on and offstage. This is particularly startling if you're sitting in an aisle seat (as I was) when Dracula himself makes a surprise appearance standing next to your seat with his cape flowing.
Related: How to Hunt for Buried Treasure in England The town has embraced the famous literature it has inspired. Twice a
Two new dramas offer stark and disturbing depictions of specific flavors of hell on earth that crush the soul and, on occasion, tear the body to shreds. Whether above ground or below, whether the battle is fought with guns and bombs or fear and manipulation, there are no winners.
Count Dracula may stalk the Transylvanian countryside; but his origins are much closer to Bram Stoker's homeland of Ireland. As a frail child, Bram's mother whetted his appetite for the blood thirsty character by fuelling the author's imagination with supernatural tales.
While restoring the Tokat Castle in Turkey, a secret tunnel was discovered which led to two prison-like dungeons. It’s believed one of these two rooms once held Vlad Dracula, the inspiration behind Bram Stoker’s character Count Dracula.
Although Van Helsing was truly Dracula's primary nemesis, he was only one man in a collection of characters battling the vampire. So how is it that his individual role has turned out to be so influential? It is simple, really: He contributed knowledge that nobody else had.
The Forgotten Writings of Bram Stoker is not my first book. Yet, I can't remember any book before it ever teaching me as much about archival research, or about Bram Stoker.
This excerpt was reproduced from John Edgar Browning and Bram Stoker's The Forgotten Writings of Bram Stoker, published in