brand strategy

You're not asking your client to solve the problem; that will come after the discovery process, once you've synthesized the
In times when there's so much that can pull us all apart, things like Pokemon Go bring people together. These fans have evolved in the way they interact with brands, and smart brands evolve with them.
Nathan's is hardly alone: smart publicity stunts have brought plenty of other brands big success. The Rose Bowl began as
A civil engineer recently remarked that nobody wants to pay for the upkeep of roads, public transit systems, or other infrastructure. After all, he quipped, "people get credit for building the new school, not maintaining what we already have."
The popular press has described a crisis of attention, a world awash in distraction, where consumers struggle to stay afloat
As an executive living in the digital age, communicating your value is an essential task if you want to establish yourself as a credible authority and build trust with potential customers.
Shining the spotlight on other people's brands, products and services across all of your business channels is an effective brand strategy you can use to leverage your brand to the next level.
In the age of rapid digital revolution in publishing, when readers have marketing management book options ranging from decades-old publications about how to be a successful CMO or brand manager to many different articles, there is a practical new free downloadable booklet worth reading.
Agencies should be honest about what they do best. Pretending is a slippery slope. If they have evolved their capabilities to offer more value, if they've acquired other talent to deliver differently, they should say so... when it's true.
Strategic brand management is a well-advised and profitable route. If a brand can capture the hearts and minds of its hard-to-please consumers and, even better, harness a 'spirit of the times', it will benefit from commitment, passion and even advocacy.
The explosion of digital platforms is causing many marketers to rethink how they engage with consumers. But sometimes in their hurry to embrace the digital world, companies often lose their way and forget the basic principles of good marketing and branding.
Figuring out a brand strategy for the new generation begins with understanding who the new generation is.
As 2014 gets underway, something profound is afoot among some of the world's largest brands. They are doing things differently and challenging the status quo. Rather than being daunted by the prospect of change, they have the courage to embrace it, which I would argue is setting them up for a more successful future.
Sinead O'Connor is worried about Miley. So is Elton John. So are the bearded guys of Duck Dynasty. But I'm not. Because I know that Miley is a strategic genius and that brands actually have quite a bit to learn from her.
These brands have such a cult following, they don't need to waste a dime on advertising their products.
Mark Pollard is very careful not to let semantics get in the way. And argues you shouldn't either. At Big Spaceship, no one has "Creative" in their title -- being creative is the cost of entry.
In this day and age, you need to be branded. You need to be known as the go-to person for serving the need of the market in your field.
Words. So what's the solution? Do away with words. 2. Good brand strategy demands stories. Where did the brand come from
Just as protecting one's good brand name requires attention, companies need to also be aware of how their name is being used -- and recognize when it may be time to get a little friendlier.
To compete in the post-recession world, marketers of big-brands will need to focus on excellent execution of brand strategy and stay focused on innovation in order to stay ahead of private labels.