Brandan Robertson

Evangelicalism, as a movement, is officially divided.
How can colleges who believe that LGBT+ people are inherently flawed and sinful ever cultivate an environment in which we flourish
Brandan Robertson's Nomad, newly released in the UK and Ireland, is a hope-filled, refreshing autobiography that invites any spiritually open, thinking person to take a deeper, honest look at her or his own spiritual journey.
First, everything belongs. Mr. Robertson began to pen Nomad while he was a senior at Moody. After graduation, he took a few
Last year, after much study and prayer, I came out in an article in TIME Magazine as queer for the first time, because I was convinced that my Christian faith and interpretation of the Bible led me to fully embrace sexual and gender minorities as equal, beautiful children of God.
The spiritually interested among us, which seems to actually be the majority of the population, have found ourselves attracted
People everywhere are talking about Trump and asking the question, "How could a man like this gain so much power and prominence in our country?" When we look at Donald Trump, we are seeing is many of the current values of Americans, both liberal and conservative, being incarnated.
The problem was that I was most often coming back empty handed. But then I heard Dr. Enns' statement- "cultivate a relationship
We must resist the temptation to get caught up in the politicized games surrounding these issues and instead, keep our focus on the real lives of real people that have been cut short because of the lack of mental health care and ease of access to firearms.
It doesn't mean that I am a Republican. It doesn't mean that I am pro-life, anti-LGBTQ rights, or pro-guns. It also doesn't mean that I am a Democrat. It doesn't necessarily mean that I am pro-immigration reform or pro-socialized medicine. Evangelical has absolutely nothing to do with political affiliation or social agendas.
A growing number of Christians are realizing that queer love is real love, and that to deny the power of love is to deny something fundamental to our faith. When reality and theology clash, reality will always win out.
Last weekend, when I stepped onto the campus of UCLA I could feel the buzz. A line extended throughout the campus of energetic people chatting with one another they waited to enter Royce Hall.
It is easy to spin Kim Davis's story as one of persecution. It's easy to get on FOX News and warn pastors that this is what's coming for them if they refuse to perform same-sex marriage. But to do so would be dishonest. Because the reality is that Kim Davis is not being persecuted for her faith, she is reaping the consequences of refusing to do her job as an agent of the state.
Many have said it before, but it bears repeating here. There is a major problem within Evangelical Christianity. And that problem is that many leaders within Evangelicalism have decided that the Gospel is not truly good news for everyone.
Every person I met and every story I heard was a clear testimony to me that brighter days lie ahead for LGBTQ people in the Church.
There and hundreds of teachings contained in the 4 Gospels of the New Testament, teachings that, if we obeyed, would absolutely flip our lives and world upside-down for the glory of God and the good of all people.
The President's announcement of executive action on immigration Thursday is not only necessary but also praiseworthy. We have been fighting this battle for far too long. As a Christian, I feel compelled by the Gospel of Christ to work for protection for immigrants as directly as possible.
This week, evangelical Christians will converge in Tennessee to attend a conference in opposition of marriage equality. I'll be there as a representative of Evangelicals for Marriage Equality, to present the signatures of hundreds of evangelicals -- one thousand, in fact -- who disagree.