brave-new-foundation

Profiting off mass incarceration is a dirty business. When private prison company Corrections Corporation of America squanders taxpayer money and runs facilities rife with human rights abuses, it's dragging its own name through the mud.
Under many civil asset forfeiture laws around the country, cops can take people's money and property without proving anyone guilty, or indeed without even making an arrest. The more they seize, the better off their departments are.
The country's biggest for-profit prison companies already pull in hundreds of millions of dollars a year locking up immigrants in federal custody. They stand to pull in even more money if the new laws generate lots of new prisoners.
Oliver Stone, Cenk Uygur, Tom Morello, Henry Rollins, and Shepard Fairey -- all progressive heroes and leading forces in their field -- have lent their voices in praising our upcoming investigative documentary Unmanned: America's Drone Wars.
We shouldn't have two criminal justice systems -- one for the rich and one for the rest of us. The commercial bail industry needs to know we're watching.
Corizon is just one of the many powerful companies getting rich off mass incarceration. As long as Corizon is motivated by its bottom line rather than the health of prisoners, there will always be a perverse incentive to not provide treatment.
Prisoners are often housed hundreds of miles from their families, making phone the only way to connect on a routine basis. Global Tel*Link's high rates allow the company to profiteer off this basic human need.
Next week, it will be 50 years since Martin Luther King Jr. gave the "I Have a Dream" speech. He railed then against "the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination." Yet he could not have imagined that Jim Crow would soon be replaced with another oppressive system: mass incarceration.
The show demonstrates a solid commitment to generating empathy for prisoners and exposing the systemic problems that plague criminal justice in the United States. There are, however, deep problems with the criminal justice system that Orange does not raise.
If you were to make a list of things that a sitting judge should not believe, I suspect one item would be that some racial groups are inherently inclined to be guilty.
Policymakers hoping to find meaningful offsets to fund disaster aid will have look at: 1) Where there's a lot of money, 2) where the spending is unjustifiable, and 3) where the politics and public opinion are conducive to allowing cuts, since there are very few areas in which that's true.
If a vindictive, biased justice system is irreconcilable with the Gospel, what is a Christian to do? The answer is first to get outraged -- a perfectly Christian emotion if it next leads to action that helps the powerless in their struggle for justice.
The debate over Florida Atlantic University's decision to name a football stadium after a notorious private prison company has descended into deception.
Word came out yesterday that Florida Atlantic University had sold the naming rights to its new football stadium to the GEO Group, which is the second largest private prison company in America. It now appears that the GEO Group decided to give its Wikipedia page a facelift.
Media lapdogs are marked by stenographic tendencies, sympathetic frames and a reliance on industry jargon. Politico's latest report about Congressional Republicans working to undo looming defense cuts meets all three criteria.
It was like a meaningless coda, as the war contractors at Blackwater USA changed its name again, two weeks after delivering Katy Helvenston-Wettengel another insult. She has been fighting for justice and accountability for the death of her son, a Blackwater employee.
As more Americans sour on our 10-year-old nation-building experiment in Afghanistan, there's a growing community uniting to expose the myriad of ways war spending has plunged our nation into a jobs crisis.
Ohio, Mississippi and Maine got a lot of the headlines, but North Carolina voters also struck a heroic blow against the Koch brothers in elections Tuesday night.
The war industry stood back with glee when it released a shoddy study that produced the sought-after deceptive headlines about defense spending, the magic sauce of job creation.