break up the banks

Both Wall Street and Hillary Clinton came under heavy fire in a heated Manhattan speech.
The former CEO of Citicorp, which merged with Travelers Insurance in 1998 to create the mega-bank Citigroup, told the Financial Times in an interview published Sunday that it's time to reinstate the Glass-Steagall Act.
Reed also argued his point in a 2009 letter to The New York Times, saying that separating commercial and investment banking
But the fact that a bank lobbyist even felt the need to make a public assault on Brown-Vitter suggests there is momentum
So that's two people who were in Washington yesterday, saying things that were not, objectively speaking, a hot sack of horse
It's troubling when some of the nation's top economists tell us Wall Street banks are too big. It's even more worrisome when
I agree with George Will about as often as the Boston Red Sox agree with the New York Yankees, but as the law of broken clocks suggests, we must both be right at least twice a day.
The progressive Ohio senator sat down with The Huffington Post in advance of his Thursday speech on the Senate floor to discuss
WASHINGTON -- A top Federal Reserve official is having second thoughts about his 2009 declaration that breaking up the biggest
Our finance industry is on the attack again. The industry target now is the Volcker rule -- the proposed rule that would limit the ability of banks to trade for their own account. Leading the attack has been JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon.
The Wall Street bill has much to be said for it, but the unfortunate truth is that it ducks several of the most critical reforms needed to protect our economy from banker abuse.
No matter what else is ultimately enacted in the name of Wall Street reform, Congress decided last night that it will not confront the single greatest problem in the U.S. economy: Too Big To Fail.
We're conducting a whip count on the SAFE Banking Act amendment to the financial reform bill right now. You can help.
With two-thirds of the nation supporting reform, any political party that throws in its lot with Wall Street will pay a major price come November. No amount of Wall Street campaign cash can counter voter outrage.
Senate Republicans say they're against both the bailouts and the Democrats' proposed legislation to end them. They say the Dodd bill would "actually guarantees future bailouts." It's time for the them to put up or shut up.
Breaking up the banks does not guarantee good regulation. However, a break-up of the big banks will at least give the country some hope that things can change.
The only way to make sure no bank it 'too big to fail' is to make sure no bank is too big. If our current leaders fail to do this, you have every reason to believe it's because Wall Street has paid them not to.
Thursday night's passage of Wall Street reform is an event to be celebrated, but several key issues remain in play as the House and Senate iron out differences between their respective versions of the legislation.