breast-cancer-deadline-2020

All of the scientific evidence points to that strategy being more effective than a ritual search for cancer through breast self examination and mandatory annual mammography. It is time to move forward, for women's sake.
It may surprise many people, but aside from the deadline, little has changed in breast cancer over the past 50 years. Breast cancer awareness is at an all time high. Yet there is an appalling lack of results to show for all of it.
Breast Cancer Awareness month is coming to a close. And I am grateful. Every year it brings a sea of pink and this year was no different. But has anything meaningful changed from last year? Have we made progress?
We, advocates, are leading this charge. We are setting the agenda, bringing the scientists and policy makers together, implementing plans of action and moving forward to the end of breast cancer. This is all happening, albeit difficult to see through that tsunami of pink.
We must change the public global conversation about breast cancer from awareness and screening to prevention and saving lives.
Twenty-five years ago, I sat in my doctor's office and heard these words: You have breast cancer. That was in 1987, when the world's population reached five billion, a gallon of gas was 89 cents, Ronald Reagan was president and the FDA approved AZT for AIDS.
It is time we disrupt the business and system of breast cancer. It's time we disrupt the status quo. We must create an innovative environment for breast cancer research that will lead us toward the eradication of the disease.
In eight years, when the Summer Olympics are once again drawing the attention of the world, I want to be watching the games with the knowledge that we have figured out how to end breast cancer.
While we can assume that every member of Congress, the Administration and state and local governments wants to see an end to breast cancer, what are they willing to do to get there?
In September of 1987 I was a successful lawyer in Philadelphia, advocating for my clients and women's rights. I was also a wife and mother. Then I was diagnosed with breast cancer.
This Leap Year, on February 29, I encourage you to use those additional hours to become more involved in breast cancer advocacy.
Are we talking about the breast cancer issues that really matter?
In New York State, the legislature voted to commemorate today, officially this year, as Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day.