breast-cancer-research-foundation

DURABLE TOTE We just attended a fall festival in which various mini-pumpkins, gourds and bags of kettle corn were purchased
Though my mother and grandmother both had breast cancer, I never intended to focus on cancer research when I chose a career in public health. But as luck would have it, my science background would prepare me when I was diagnosed with the disease at 40 -- and shaped my career.
After some online research, Jolly decided to channel her efforts into fundraising for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation
Men are less likely to believe a lump in their breast could be cancerous, which often leads to delays in seeking treatment
To support cancer research efforts, "think pink" and feel good about doing some shopping right now. Not only will the proceeds from dedicated products go towards cancer research, but you'll splurge on yourself (and your man!) for a great cause.
Research -- and research alone -- has the power to be the end of breast cancer. Investing in research produces results. It's just that simple.
I was adopted at birth, and met my biological mother when I was 19 years old -- well after her first diagnosis, treatment and remission from breast cancer. It really didn't register at the time how close I came to never having known my own mother and best friend.
I did not find a support community for "persons that have lost a best friend." There was no one to reminisce with about old boyfriends, no more laughing over memories of high school hijinks.
When turning 27 years old, you expect some major life changes to take place. For some, it's a job promotion. For others, it's marriage or the birth of a child. For me, it was cancer. Just two weeks after my 27th birthday, I was unexpectedly diagnosed with breast cancer.
"It's obvious that they had to do this because they were getting pressured by a small minority of haters who thought that