Bret Easton Ellis

It’s the news, whether you like it or not. 1. “Doctor Who” finally got on the diversity train, casting Jodie Whittaker as
As leading man to the pounding disco drama, American Psycho at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theater, Benjamin Walker is all abs and six pack. Sinfully envious, his Patrick Bateman embodies the ethos of the bygone late century.
I sat down with author Scott Alexander Hess (The Butcher's Sons) to dialogue about fact versus fiction, how violence can be poetic, and what it really means to mine a truly dangerous literary landscape.
Writer Bruce Wagner's script for David Cronenberg's Maps to the Stars is of a piece with his other work. It blends a cynical vision of people with an even darker examination of the worship of the superficial that is Hollywood life.
Sitting in the lovely patio eating a vegan falafel bowl with Block across from me wearing a black tank top, black skinny jeans, and shiny pink Nike high-tops, I couldn't help feeling like I'd fallen into a Block novel.
Here is a compendium of characters Didion herself might appreciate, and one which her own family is now joining.
The LGBT community absolutely needs to combat the misogyny in their midst. I've lived and breathed gay rights for as long as I can remember. I've seen so much change and now I want more. Casual and accepted misogyny no longer works for me and it shouldn't work for you.
Do you remember the shock wave in January 2009 that shook the media world when a tweet broke the hard news story that a plane had to make an emergency landing on the Hudson River? That's social media in action.
In honor of this NYPL all-star novel being turned into a film, the Library's manager of reader services Lynn Lobash has compiled a list of the top five psychological thrillers turned movies. So if you're in the mood to be freaked out and "Gone Girl" is checked out, try one of these on for size.
Early Scrooge and Draper appear "normal" enough, if unsavory, to be representative of mainstream society, yet we are aware of a low-grade pathology at work. Bateman would drive off the cliff, laughing maniacally.
Some sequels are masterpieces (Huckleberry Finn, Lord of the Rings, Through the Looking Glass), and others are pleasant surprises (Doctor Sleep, the most recent Bridget Jones) but there are a few that deserve to stay hidden deep in the discount bin.
For more on Ellis, head to Vice. Kanye West shared his love for "American Psycho" back in June when he released the film
Then Junot Diaz asked me a question: "What could you possibly write that would interest people?" This being a reference to my age, and possibly my closed-off suburban background. I know that it was not meant as an insult, but at the same time, how would he know if my writing could interest people just by looking at me?
The unconventional musical has already garnered attention for its Kickstarter campaign, which managed to raise over $154,000
The Canyons offers insight into an all-too-familiar world of boredom and desperation, relationships and compromises, closeness and the abyss that separates us from our lovers. Although I wanted to dislike it, to be "cool" like my fellow critics, I ended up falling in love with the film.
There is ample reason to be interested in The Canyons, the latest Lindsay Lohan film that seems to be on everyone's lips and laptop screens. It's undoubtedly provoking, though often times not for a good reason.
Voyeurism is a necessary ingredient for all thrillers, but in The Canyons, with all the hoopla about its stars, the project itself begs the question: is this low-budget train wreck a filmic version of reality TV or cinematic verite at its finest? I don't really care.
More important than critical acclaim or box-office boom is the very distinct potential that The Canyons will come to be known as one of the most influential films in decades.
Paul Schrader, director of "The Canyons" joins HuffPost Live to discuss working with Lindsay Lohan.