BRIC

The West is in relative decline, especially compared to Asia, but no obvious alternative "system" has emerged.
The primal drive for recognition in the global pecking order tests reasoned restraint in the North Korean crisis.
As the latest BRICS summit approaches, the group's economic future looks bright.
Could neo-nationalist leaders join hands across the world? Vladimir Putin (Russia) and Narendra Modi (India) in Goa, 2016
Italy is a country of contradictions. But then, everything and everyone who is even remotely interesting to me is a mix of old and new, good and bad, mild and passionate -- with every nuance of feelings and experiences in between.
Yes, you read it right; Israel was rated by expats as the most dynamic country in the world. It even left the USA and Brazil, countries widely known for their fast and energetic culture, far behind. I bet you were not expecting this, right?
By all rights, given its size, location, and natural resource base, Brazil should be an economic juggernaut. But the truth is that Brazil should never have been designated a BRIC because it is a poorly managed economy that has rarely lived up to its potential.
The practice all but fizzled out, however, in the early 20th century, and wasn't truly revived until the 1980s, when a group
The wind appears to again be at Dilma Rousseff's back again, as Brazil's performance at the World Cup has virtually assured that she will be re-elected -- politics working as politics do.
So you've probably heard of the BRIC countries as discussion of the economic growth potential of Brazil, Russia, India and China has been all the rage, especially during the recession. But those countries are no longer the cutting edge of investment.
The news is full of the words and sightings of the brilliant Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and his somewhat mercurial President Vladimir Putin. Clearly Russia seems back. But, is this for real or only a temporary interlude?
While those squiggly black lines we call country borders have created fascinating cultures, humanity now seems destined to transcend them as the globalized workforce must move across the boundaries of countries and continents to make a better life.
2013-01-23-FinalDavosDiariesbanner.jpg Today I'm going to zap around the world a bit, outlining some global trends that are areas of opportunity, both for promoting the World Economic Forum's commitment to "improving the state of the world" and for businesses' bottom lines.
"The degree to which cyber instruments will shape the future of warfare is unclear, however," it said. "The potential opened
The government deserves credit for having stopped these attacks before they could be carried out, but the impression that is left is that terrorism will remain an influence in the Indonesian landscape for some time to come. So what does all this mean for foreign investors?
We live in a globalized, interlinked, economy -- and compared to everywhere else at the moment, America is a good place to be. At present, Europeans feel like passengers on the Titanic.
Switzerland, Singapore, Finland and Sweden, the top four most competitive nations in this year's Index, did not get where they are today without making tough, unpopular choices and longer-term strategic investments. Those that do not grasp this reality are condemned to face an uncertain future.