bringbackourgirls

On October 13, 2016, 913 days after their April 14, 2014 abduction by Boko Haram, 21 of the 276 school girls kidnapped from their school in Chibok, Nigeria were released to the Nigerian government by Boko Haram. The Nigerian government contends that the release followed "painstaking" brokered negotiations by the Swiss government on behalf of Nigeria and members of Boko Haram, the world's deadliest terror group.
As the hours, days, months, and years drag on, Mary clings to the hope that her missing daughter will be found. Last September
Shortly after their abduction in 2014, these girls were forgotten. About 50 of them escaped the terrorist group. But the large majority are still missing. After a few weeks of intense media coverage, the story evaporated from headlines, as it did from government interest.
There are certain experiences in life that are transformative. My time with Rebecca Samuel, one of the mothers of the 276 Chibok Girls of Nigeria who were abducted by Boko Haram terrorists on April 14, 2014, was one such experience.
Great Britain, on the other hand, proudly contends that Nigerians living there can be proud of her support for Nigeria in
This week marks the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe. More than an accident, it was the beginning of the meltdown of the Soviet Union and defrosting of the Cold War. Mikhail Gorbachev has written that Chernobyl "was an historic turning point" and "perhaps the real cause of the collapse of the Soviet Union five years later." The secretive, cover-up culture of the Soviet state, he recalls, kept timely information from getting to the top so a quick response could be formulated. "The Chernobyl disaster, more than anything else," says Gorbachev, "opened the possibility of much greater freedom of expression, to the point that the system as we knew it could no longer continue. It made absolutely clear how important it was to continue the policy of glasnost."(continued)
Developing countries are struggling to scale quality education for girls and ensure safe spaces where they can learn. Girls like Sa'a and Maria are proof of what girls can do for themselves and others when given the chance. Join us to reach more girls worldwide and let's make sure every girl has the opportunity to reach her full potential.
Undeniably, the world is splintering. Geopolitical blocs are forming once again, the nuclear arms race is reigniting and religious war rages. Globalization is in retreat as publics across the planet suspect trade agreements, politicians talk about building walls and refugees are turned away. Yet, as Parag Khanna, author of the new book, "Connectography," writes this week from Singapore, "the same world that appears to be falling apart is actually coming together." (continued)
It's important to remember that each life and each future of every child, whether they're in Nigeria or New Jersey, is equally precious. As Americans, however, one would hope that we have more power to affect change at home than we might have in affecting a situation starring an unhinged group of terrorists 9,000 miles away.
While the passions of internal discord have stalled the once-confident global march of the West, the East, led by China, is looking ahead with a decades-long strategy to revive the ancient Silk Road through Eurasia as the core of the world's economy and civilization. As Oxford historian Peter Frankopan, author of "The Silk Roads: A New History of the World," writes: "The age of the West is all but at an end when it comes to taking the lead and planning for the future." (continued)