british medical journal

"I must-ache-you a question. Where are all the women?"
Still, some researchers question what that study -- or others undermining the case for routine screening at 40 -- really
When it comes to the recovery of a patient, no matter how small an improvement is, there is still a level of improvement that is taking place. Something as subtle as the blink of an eye can be a monumental milestone because in that split second you are witnessing a speck of light in a world that had the possibility of remaining in complete darkness.
Trust. It's a hefty word, stamped on American currency ("In God We Trust"), integrated into marriage vows, and considered a vital component for both professional and personal relationships. Yet too often trust is on autopilot, given freely unless proven otherwise.
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What I can remember about my mother's death from breast cancer certainly does not reflect Dr. Smith's romantic view of dying.
When you're going into surgery, the type of music that your doctors will be listening to is probably the last thing on your
A study denouncing the value of mammography tore through the news cycle last week, leading many women to once again question the need for these breast cancer screenings. What was left out of many of the media reports are serious doubts about the validity of this study.
This story illustrates a growing tendency for some journals to use lay opinions to stir controversy in hopes of increasing visibility and impact.
The evidence is compelling that we in the developed countries (especially the US) are overtesting for disease, overdiagnosing it, and overtreating.