broadband access

Left behind at school, at home and at work: "The civil rights issue of our time"
What if I told you that a hundred thousand San Franciscans, including thousands of public school students did not have electricity or water at home? I imagine many of you would be appalled and call for our government to step in and help. Now, substitute the Internet for water and electricity. Would you still be upset?
Rosenworcel also hopes to break down another major roadblock to America's future success: the lack of diversity in science
Far too many African Americans, Hispanics, and low-income families remain unconnected to broadband. Many don't see the value in going online; others simply don't have the skills to put their connections to use. The FCC's new rules won't help to address these challenges.
The bottom line here: What needs to change so that we ensure all children have access to a quality K-12 education?
Continuing to rely on the same old wired telephone regulations to govern a world where consumers communicate in different forms, and over various platforms and services, no longer makes sense.
There are many things to do with $159 billion, this is just one idea. An idea that helps the company and country.
Reality check: Be thankful you're not one of the 49 million Americans living in food insecure households. Learn how to help
LGBT communities have relied on broadband technology in several unique ways since its earliest inception. In many instances the Internet served to decrease isolation and spark empowerment by eliminating geographic barriers that long separated LGBT individuals and their communities.
Two Asian nations -- Korea and Singapore -- have managed to leapfrog multiple stages of economic development and have transformed into economic miracles. This comes as no accident, in part, because both have taken a planned approach to technological development, starting with national broadband plans, which has led to increased broadband adoption, and successive waves of economic growth.