broadband access

Left behind at school, at home and at work: "The civil rights issue of our time"
What if I told you that a hundred thousand San Franciscans, including thousands of public school students did not have electricity or water at home? I imagine many of you would be appalled and call for our government to step in and help. Now, substitute the Internet for water and electricity. Would you still be upset?
Rosenworcel also took inspiration from her bosses on Capitol Hill, where she worked starting in 2007. She served as senior
Far too many African Americans, Hispanics, and low-income families remain unconnected to broadband. Many don't see the value in going online; others simply don't have the skills to put their connections to use. The FCC's new rules won't help to address these challenges.
The bottom line here: What needs to change so that we ensure all children have access to a quality K-12 education?
Continuing to rely on the same old wired telephone regulations to govern a world where consumers communicate in different forms, and over various platforms and services, no longer makes sense.
There are many things to do with $159 billion, this is just one idea. An idea that helps the company and country.
Updated December 2, 2013: 12 p.m. EST. 5. Woe is me: You still live at home. Reality check: Be thankful you're not one of
LGBT communities have relied on broadband technology in several unique ways since its earliest inception. In many instances the Internet served to decrease isolation and spark empowerment by eliminating geographic barriers that long separated LGBT individuals and their communities.
Two Asian nations -- Korea and Singapore -- have managed to leapfrog multiple stages of economic development and have transformed into economic miracles. This comes as no accident, in part, because both have taken a planned approach to technological development, starting with national broadband plans, which has led to increased broadband adoption, and successive waves of economic growth.
FCC chairmen often fall into one of two camps -- stern regulators focused on compliance or free-market stalwarts eager to spark private sector growth. Chairman Genachowski is rare in his ability to simultaneously accomplish both goals.
Author David Cay Johnston won a Pulitzer Prize in 2001 for his reporting on U.S. tax policy. But in his just released book, The Fine Print, Johnston falls woefully short of that standard in his attempt to critique the state of broadband in the U.S.
As Democrats convene this week in Charlotte and outline their plan to jumpstart the economy, an important tool for implementing
About one-third of Americans, or 100 million people, do not subscribe to high-speed Internet, an increasingly vital tool
HuffPost Live will be taking a comprehensive look at the persistence of poverty in America Aug. 29 and Sept. 5 from 12-4
“The U.S. has now regained global leadership in key areas of the broadband economy, including mobile, where we lead in mobile
S. Craig Watkins, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin who studies the digital habits of teens, has been struck
"I am here because I believe the new technologies like the Internet and wireless communications can have an enormous, positive
In the next weeks, we'll be fighting to protect the rights of communities to determine how they'll access information in the 21st century. We can't let corporations and their politician friends hijack our right to build better broadband.