brood ii cicadas

WASHINGTON -- The Dairy Godmother's newest flavor combines two Summer 2013 standbys: frozen custard and cicadas. Introducing
If you haven't had the pleasure of experiencing the cicada invasion firsthand, then Discovery's Science Channel has the perfect
After a dark 17-year juvenile period underground, hormones and warm soil temperatures (64 degrees Fahrenheit to be precise
The Ritz-Carlton won't be the only D.C. destination serving cicada-themed drinks. When Brood X cicadas emerged from the ground
For everyone else, we've rounded up 10 tasty ways to make use of Swarmageddon 2013. Let us know if you try any of the recipes
We have made first contact. And check out just how much these cicadas have missed since the last time they saw sunlight! Billions
The cicadas are back ... and they've missed a lot. The insects won't cause harm to humans or animals and you can track the
After 17 years underground, billions of cicadas are about to emerge all over the East Coast. Although they might be harmless, they'll outnumber humans 600 to 1. Louis Sorkin from the Museum of Natural History joins us to tell us what we need to know.
After 17 years underground, billions of cicadas are about to emerge all over the East Coast. Although they might be harmless, they'll outnumber humans 600 to 1. Louis Sorkin from the Museum of Natural History joins us to tell us what we need to know.
I watched my sons carefully to see if they were buying into mom's passionate ode to nature. The boys seemed to be warming up to the cicadas swarming around them when several flew up and landed on Connor. "Dad!" he yelled. "Get them off me!"
(AP) - Any day now, billions of cicadas with bulging red eyes will crawl out of the earth after 17 years underground and
By the end of May, the inch-and-a-half-long insects will come out in full force, swarming in massive, noisy clouds up and
We couldn't agree more. So HuffPost has joined with Laurie and every Friday afternoon, just in time for dinner, our editors
"Brood II is a periodic cicada that hatches out every 17 years," Craig Gibbs, an entomologist at the Wildlife Conservation