brooksley born

Social anthropologist Janine Wedel, author, most lately, of Unaccountable: How Elite Power Brokers Corrupt Our Finances, Freedom, and Security, has spent decades getting to the bottom of how powerful people wield influence. Truth and transparency, she warns, have devolved into a performance art.
In interviews with whistleblowers, many say that they didn't talk sooner because of their loyalty to the institutions they were a part of. Perhaps women, never being fully embraced by the institution, don't develop a deep loyalty, or perhaps only sip the Kool-Aid.
Obama's expected nomination of Summers was a perfect example of that critical flaw. Repeated appointments of inadequate individuals with questionable résumés -- whether out of loyalty or cronyism -- leaves the government vulnerable to recurrent failure.
And so we end where we began, with Brooksley Born on the phone with Larry Summers, and his thirteen pimp-bankers haranguing
For journalists who are being told what a brilliant man and insightful regulator Larry Summers was behind the scenes, here are a few items from his public record you might want to review.
There are worse things in life than terrible phone manners, imperiousness and excessive confidence, but these traits have just become more relevant amid the disclosures that Larry Summers appears to be the front-runner to take over as Federal Reserve chairman assuming Ben Bernanke steps down early next year.
Larry Summers is the wrong guy for the wrong job at the wrong time. This pick is terrible politics and worse substance.
Larry Summers for the Fed? Seriously? There are better choices for Federal Reserve chair; in particular, Janet Yellen. The White House is not actively shooting this down, and this is just an insult to American women.
In government, corporate and nonprofit offices across the country are women who are smart, work hard and care about their profession but are regularly ignored because they are viewed as too mousy or too pouty or too inexperienced or too something.
So that's two people who were in Washington yesterday, saying things that were not, objectively speaking, a hot sack of horse
If we can't trust banks to run a foreclosure review process with some amount of precision, how in the heck do we expect them to run the world's financial systems and not take us for a deep dive again?
Just recently, Washington announced the creation of a "dream team" of financial regulators, called the Systemic Risk Council. Great idea, but here's a question: Why was the current chairwoman of the SEC, Mary Schapiro, not included?
On Thursday, Gary Gensler, the CFTC's chairman, said that the House Appropriations bill was proof that Congress "sides with
Most bankers are not the unethical and blindly greedy creatures that politicians and the media make them out to be; and there is no doubt that without the productive activities of the banking sector, no other industry in our nation would be able to survive or thrive. But that does not mean there isn't a ghost in the machine.
So far, much of the reform focus in the wake of the JPMorgan news has turned to implementing the so-called Volcker rule, which
Like efforts by good citizens to clean up a decrepit park frequented by drug dealers, it's time to pick up the trash left by the financial destruction, and challenge each other to clean up our acts.
Some younger readers might need a refresher course in the workings of a thing called the Soviet Union. Republican apologists for Wall Street are doing their best to provide one.
Frustrated in part by the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission's chairman, Phil Angelides, and the tenor of the panel's preliminary