bryan stevenson

The actor is playing Equal Justice Initiative founder Bryan Stevenson, who has fought for the wrongly condemned and convicted for decades.
After Anthony Ray Hinton spent 30 years awaiting his death sentence, his case went to the Supreme Court and he was set free. Now, he’s working to abolish the death penalty entirely.
An HBO documentary about Bryan Stevenson sounds an urgent call to examine the nation's past, from slavery to lynching.
The National Memorial for Peace and Justice draws a line from the slavery and lynching of the past to the criminal justice system of today.
A new memorial in Alabama will recognize the people of color lost to lynching in America, and try to reckon with the nation’s history of racial terror.
The project gives a comprehensive look at the impact of lynching on generations of black families.
A key to changing America's future is changing the narrative we tell ourselves about our shared past.
As a nation, we have failed to confront systemic racism. This won't change without white people really engaging. Developing this ability requires regular workouts as well as a heavy dose of humility.
I am finally sitting in the foundation of my being. An artist-academic-activist, a Black woman who speaks her mind, I have been through hell and back and managed to individuate within an historically white institution.
Graduation ceremonies are inspiring, and yesterday's was particularly so. As the seniors departed, I was hopeful that all our graduates, whatever their majors and plans for the future, learned three broad things while they were in college.
While most of us do not devote ourselves to causes in the way that Bryan Stevenson does, there is much for us to learn in how we live our lives and through service to our communities as volunteers and nonprofit board members.
Bryan Stevenson is unwavering in that vision and in lifting his voice of great moral clarity at the forefront of the struggle. Every new hard-earned and overdue victory should remind us all that we must keep moving towards greater justice for all.
"All of a sudden, I knew I wanted to help condemned people get to higher ground," says Bryan Stevenson.
State officials in New York are reforming their policy of keeping people convicted of non-violent offenses in solitary confinement. Some hail the decision; others, including corrections officers, object, saying that solitary confinement is necessary to maintain control, and they say that keeping an individual in solitary confinement is not inhumane.
"More people have said, 'What can I do to help you?' in the last 14 hours of my life than they ever did in the first 19 years."
It's not about, "Does this person deserve to die?" says attorney Bryan Stevenson.