Bubble

With the Gilded Age of Trump about to dawn (or should it be Golden Showered Age?) ... I've become almost desperately eager
The kinds of relationships people have with technology brands are changing. In the Digital Age, the brands that will dominate
Out of context, a spike in VC deals would suggest that it's business as usual in Silicon Valley. But I think there's something
Startups continue failing at an alarming seventy to eighty percent rate for top picked opportunities, while, for average startups, the failure rate is closer to 95 percent.
ECB President Mario Draghi has been highly effective with his words alone -- moving markets with speeches and little action. However, by doing so he has also set the bar high and expectations for action are becoming the norm.
It is time we recognize the impact that Generation Xers across the globe have had on the Millennials' outlook on life, work, politics, civic engagement, entrepreneurship, activism or culture. Let's not sell our Millennials short. Let's add nuance and perspective to the conversation. Let's burst that bubble, shall we?
A bubble is a rise in prices that is unsustainable because it is based partly or entirely on expectations that prices will rise. Bubbles are vulnerable to shocks that raise questions about the validity of the price expectation.
Is Uber worth $18 billion? Hey, why not? But that doesn't matter. What matters is that a lot of smart people believe it's worth $18 billion and there are a lot of smart pundits and analysts will back up this belief too.
This has all the makings of a bubble and when it bursts, it will hobble students' ability to borrow for college. Reforms are needed, but there is very little political will and talk of bubbles never penetrates those inside the bubble.
It's pretty hard to miss the shampoo cycle -- bubble, bust, repeat -- that has characterized the last few business cycles in the American, and more recently, European and even Scandinavian economies. It's also the case that choice economists since Adam (Smith, of course) have recognized this proclivity towards financial market instability. Thus far in the current expansion that began in 2009Q3, financial markets and corporate profitability have far outpaced the rest of the economy. I'm not saying we're in another financial bubble, though no less than Robert Shiller recently raised that concern. But I'm decidedly saying that unless we enact and enforce tough financial market regulation, that's where we're headed.
An American who won this year's Nobel Prize for economics believes sharp rises in equity and property prices could lead to a dangerous financial bubble and may end badly, he told a German magazine.
"I am not yet sounding the alarm. But in many countries stock exchanges are at a high level and prices have risen sharply
All of which brings us to our saga's climax: the news that a whopping 30 'distressed' coal projects are up for sale in India
You can never be too old to enjoy a good bubble burst, and hopefully you can never be too jaded to enjoy gigantic bubble
But at the end of the day we don't need to justify future projections - we just need to point to what's already happening
If the global financial crisis -- and the events that led up to it -- have taught us anything, it is, "No complacency with asset price booms." We know firsthand the dire consequences of bubbles.
Yes, there are lessons in history. But untangling those lessons, like anticipating the sentiments of voters, is a process that shifts as we attempt to capture it. And so from left and right we end up chasing a kind of essence, an equilibrium, which may not exist.
Five years after the Great Recession wiped trillions of dollars off global stock markets, the world is facing another economic risk from the fossil fuel industry.
I had a chance to talk with Jean Case, CEO of the Case Foundation, about their commitment to make big bets, innovate, learn from failure, collaborate and do it all with a sense of urgency.