Bud Selig

There’s something about baseball in March, about spring training in Florida and Arizona. Yes, it’s a sign the new season
As I mentioned previously it seems as if there are always some bizarre or hilarious developments in the world of sport while I am out of touch. A few days ago I reported on my experiences watching hockey in Russia. Now I want to revisit what many of you will consider old news.
Pete Rose continues to feel that he has been unfairly treated by the baseball establishment, and I believe that with an expanded lens of the changing culture regarding athletes' transgressions, perhaps leniency in his case is now in order.
Selig's legacy is as follows: When baseball needed a strong commissioner, he was the game's nowhere man. When he did act, it was in the best interests of owners -- and not in the best interests of the game and its fans.
It is clear that over his long and rocky tenure as Commissioner of Baseball, Bud Selig left a massive legacy. The business and sport of major league baseball was impacted for good and for ill by the man who began his professional life selling used cars in Milwaukee. He will end his tenure as Commissioner by becoming the "Six Million Dollar Man."
As years go, 2014 was an interesting one in the sports world. Some might characterize it as depressing while others may look back on it as exhilarating. Whatever the case may be we know that at some point in the future we will look back on the year 2014 with nostalgia.
Is this really an appropriate, or necessary, gift to a pitcher who this year earned $3.75 million? If Bumgarner wants a new car, he can certainly afford to buy one, and to pick the car he really wants.
Mr. Selig's approach to running Major League Baseball is proof that you can modernize an institution while celebrating its bond with tradition. But the lesson runs even deeper.
Selig's legacy may be that he lost the next generation of baseball fans. This is Selig's last World Series. Perhaps nothing demonstrates how baseball has turned off young sports fans than how young sports fans have turned off the World Series.
Over the course of the 162 game baseball season of 2014, four teams won 94 or more games. Today as four teams remain in baseball's postseason tournament, only one of those teams is still playing.
The campaign to retire Roberto Clemente's number 21 is now in its eighth year and has accomplished quite a bit. It has worked with over 12 cities throughout the United States that have all passed resolutions, or have issued a citation urging the commissioner to retire Clemente's #21.
Figuring out a way to replace that revenue and continue to adjust to the new media world, rather than determining ways to make the game more exciting or figure out the best post-season formula, will be the criteria by which the next commissioner will be judged.
We live in the United States of America, a country known for its second chances. It's time we give Pete Rose his second chance for all the memories he gave us. Twenty-five years is long enough. Bud Selig needs to do the right thing, step up to the plate and remove the ban.
Originally, Captain America was a limp, scrawny runt. At a trading card convention, he met Jose Canseco, who hooked him up with Roger Clemens. Even though Captain America was frozen for 70 years, his urine still tests hot.
By inducting Clemens, Boston seems to be bucking the Selig iron rule of baseball morality: that no player accused of using performance enhancing drugs shall be recognized for his past achievements.
Say what you will about Alex Rodriguez -- hate him for his arrogance, disdain him for his ego, be jealous of his salary, etc. -- shouldn't he nevertheless be accorded the same due process as anyone else?
Although Rodriguez may think that MLB's aggressiveness to procure evidence was motivated by a personal vendetta, the public should recognize it for what it is -- an energetic effort by MLB to eliminate the use of performance enhancing drugs from the national pastime.
The 1988 AL MVP is a member of the 40/40 Club and the perhaps the sport's preeminent confessors of steroid use. In hopes
The Biogenesis case raises many other questions concerning drug use in sports. We live in world in which science and technology have altered the definition of what is normal, and blurred categories of what is or is not possible. These questions are not going away after the Biogenesis case vanishes.