Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

The former vice president’s gun control plan would require owners of assault-style weapons to either sell their guns or register them with the ATF.
Armor-piercing rounds have been banned for decades, but one of the project's creators claims the process will be cheap and completely legal.
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is calling it one of the largest single gun thefts it has investigated.
As American gun sales and manufacturing have exploded, the ATF's budget and capabilities have remained stagnant.
The gun industry's output doubled over the Obama era -- and it appears likely to keep growing.
One GOP senator said that maybe Congress should do so.
Why? The federal firearms agency won't hand over documents showing the NRA's influence on gun policy.
The organization's president said some lawmakers are "shirking their responsibility."
In a data visualization called "firearms and frappuccinos," the comparison between America's favorite coffee shop and licensed gun dealers is made painstakingly clear.
WASHINGTON -- An amendment offered in the Senate Wednesday would block the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and
On one side are those who explain these ghastly incidents as the outcome of a failed mental health system. On the other are pundits who say these preventable deaths are the consequence of America's patent inability to regulate guns. They are both right.
Recently U.S. Senators Mark Kirk (R-Ill.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) proposed naming the Washington headquarters of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives after Eliot Ness, leader of the famed "Untouchables."
One year later, despite Congress's appalling lack of action, there has been important progress in some areas and states. The White House has quietly delivered on most of the executive actions President Obama promised in the aftermath of the Newtown shooting.
The ATF has worked with officials from the TSA, the Secret Service and the FBI, all of which are concerned about the spread
Former U.S. Attorney Marc Jiménez, who served under President George W. Bush, agrees with ATF's position. ATF Agent John
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is seeking answers after the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) told an ATF agent he isn't permitted to be paid for publishing a book about his experience calling attention to a controversial operation that allowed guns to flow to Mexican drug cartels.
WASHINGTON -- The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is seeking answers after the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms