Burmese

As a Burmese American observing Myanmar (also known as Burma) from afar throughout decades of military rule, I worried that
Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo were reporting on the Rohingya crisis in Rakhine State.
As an American civil rights lawyer who was born in Myanmar (or Burma, as I still call it), I watched with horror this summer
More than 600,000 persecuted Muslims have fled Myanmar in just two months.
More than 200 villages have been burnt to the ground.
This week, Aung San Suu Kyi will walk to the podium in an assembly hall in Myanmar (Burma) and call to order representatives of the 135 ethnic peoples who make up the population of the country. In convening this Second Panglong Conference, she is resuming the work her father, Aung San, began in 1947, and left unfinished because assassins ended his life.
I left Myanmar will a camera full of images from the golden hued temples of Bagan, the tranquil floating villages of Inle Lake and the expansive Irrawaddy River. However, what is etched in my memory is Myanmar's people.
Myanmar's detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi is expected to be released from house arrest just six days after a
Burmese monks talk to HuffPost about Suu Kyi's arrest, repression in Burma and the state of the democracy movement about a year and a half after the Saffron Revolution.
The Karens actually arrived in Burma before the Burmans, but in the sixteenth century, the Burmans conquered most of Burma and proceeded to impose their will on the ethnics.