business-planning

I learned that you need a vision that inspires the people that work for you so that you can grow and go together.
As a business owner, I know there's nothing quite as stressful as getting blindsided by an unexpected financial blow. And as a business owner, you know you need to prepare. But how? How do you cope with that inevitable cash flow crapper?
When I work with startups, I am invariably asked whether they "really need to bother with a business plan." Small businesses owners pose the same question.
Your family and your community are counting on you to make smart decisions about your personal financial affairs. You owe it to them to get it right -- and a personal CFO is the best resource to make it happen.
There are several considerations that go into creating your 2015 sales calendar for your business. These include nationally designated days and holidays, your business history, your customers and their financial behavior, and social media tie-ins.
To ensure success in the new year, most small businesses don't realize that the process begins long before January 1. Instead, a lot of work goes into setting your business up for a running start when the clock strikes 12.
While I fantasize about quitting my 9-5 nearly every day to work for myself, I know that my business is not ready; I still need the income from my full-time job to invest in building a strong and sustainable foundation for my future of self-employment.
What does every entrepreneur want to find under his or her Christmas tree more than anything else? Without exception, small business entrepreneurs want to open the gift of business growth that lasts through good times and bad.
Are you ready to slow your roll, gain a bird's eye view, and harness the power for a stellar year ahead? If so, start with an end-of-year business assessment.
No matter how much we plan to accomplish in a day, the tyranny of the urgent seems to take over. Each circumstance provides the opportunity to take you away from any planning for the day, week and sometimes month.
Today, we're more reactive as people than we have ever been in our history. Technology has made it possible to access information instantaneously, and to reach anyone across the globe instantaneously, whenever we choose.
I'll begin where the majority of successful entrepreneurs begin--"follow your passion." It may be a shopworn phrase, but this advice is as valid today for how to succeed in business as it was a hundred years ago, and it has certainly proven true for me.
Of course you should know your business, your team, your strengths and weaknesses, and your market. That's absolutely essential. But do you take the business time to describe it in comprehensive detail, with edited text, statistics and formal research? No.