C. S. Lewis

Rights for all seven of C.S. Lewis' "Narnia" books have been sold to Netflix.
Once, when Walter Hooper asked Lewis if he ever gave thought to his bourgeoning reputation, Lewis answered in a "low, still voice, and with the deepest and most complete humility I've ever observed in anyone, 'One cannot be too careful not to think of it.'"
In this paradigm people are faced with an arduous task (climbing higher) in what can be a difficult place (a mountain). But
Room presents viewers with an important question--one that, at least in my mind, is profoundly religious in nature, even theological. That is, why do we tell fairytales? I don't mean the Disney-fied kind. I mean the ones that are found in the pages of the Grimm brother's collection.
For my money, I don't think the desire for transcendence is going away. But I do wonder if students will bet their lives that the answer for this search lies beyond our world.
What would be possible if we allowed ourselves to be vulnerable, to take the risks that love demands?
Raised in the Church of Ireland but an atheist by age 15, Lewis slowly embraced Christianity through the works of authors
In America, biblical morality was accepted as central to educating the whole person. That is what Noah Webster, author of our Dictionary and founder of a historic university, meant when he wrote "Education is useless without the Bible."
His books are selling more than 6 million copies a year, new special editions of "The Screwtape Letters" and "A Grief Observed" are due out this year, and this November, he will join Shakespeare, T. S. Eliot and Chaucer as writers buried or commemorated in Westminster Abbey's Poets Corner. It is, literally, the year of C. S. Lewis.
One of the best ways to dismiss the ideas of others, without ever having to think about them, is to label them as quickly as they are uttered. Some roads to hell may be paved with good intentions, but others are made smooth by a flippant bigotry that avoids truth by stereotyping.
Light on the nature of the world can come from any source, whether it is C.S. Lewis or his polar opposite, Richard Dawkins, or simply a song I hear on the radio. In any case, if there is truth to what I hear, I would be foolish to ignore it.
In Freud's Last Session, now at the West Side Y's Little Theater, Sigmund Freud and C.S. Lewis engage in a battle of wits that is exciting and thought-provoking. And it makes for riveting theater.