cadillac tax

Whether or not Obamacare is repealed, it will have left an impact on the health care landscape.
He's starting a conversation on the "Cadillac tax" that his successor can finish.
The President's 2017 budget will recommend improvements in the "Cadillac tax" -- the excise tax on high-cost health insurance plans. While some suggest repealing the tax, reforming it to preserve most of its revenues and its ability to slow health care cost growth makes far more sense.
We are beginning to see signs that Congress may be willing to move beyond the partisan divide over the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which hopefully means that we can fix problems with current law, build upon what is working, and continue to make progress in improving our nation's health care system. It is about time.
The new tax agreement could be better than the alternatives.
The "omnibus" budget for the next year is out. Here are some of the winners and losers.
The Cadillac Tax is a major component of Obamacare, that has yet to be implemented. But what exactly is it? HuffPost is here to explain.
Congress is poised to delay the controversial "Cadillac tax" by two years.
Our union represents more than a quarter million hotel, food service and gaming industry workers who make at most $50,000 per year in wages and benefits. The majority of UNITE HERE's members are women and immigrants. Most drive modest family cars--not Cadillacs--if they have a car at all.
Because the Cadillac tax will undercut benefits and punish employees who participate in FSA and HSA plans, patients will bear more upfront costs when they seek out medical care. That means more patients will forgo primary care, routine checkups, and treatment at the first signs of illness.
Perhaps the most debated provision of the Affordable Care Act, the Cadillac tax, is at the forefront of discussion among employers and politicians across the country.